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Cendol

Cendol is a traditional dessert originating from Southeast Asia which is popular in Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar (where it is known as mont let saung), Singapore, Vietnam, and Thailand.

General ingredients in Cendol

The dessert’s basic ingredients are coconut milk, a worm-like jelly made from rice flour with green food colouring  (usually derived from the pandan leaf), shaved ice and palm sugar. Other ingredients such as red beans, glutinous rice, grass jelly, creamed corn, might also be included.

In Sunda, Indonesia, cendol is a dark-green pulpy dish of rice (or sago) flour worms with coconut milk and syrup of areca sugar. It used to be served without ice. In Javanese, cendol refers to the green jelly-like part of the beverage, while the combination of cendol, palm sugar and coconut milk is called dawet. The most famous variant of Javanese es dawet is from Banjarnegara, Central Java.

The affluence of Singapore, as well as Western influence, has given rise to different variations of cendol, such as cendol with vanilla ice-cream or topped with durian.

 

 

Indonesian Es Cendol
Es cendol is an Indonesian drink made from rice flour served with coconut milk, sugar palm and ice cubes or shaved ice. While Indonesian people drink es cendol as a nice refreshment, a lot of Westerners like es cendol as dessert. All around Indonesia, es cendol is sold at hawker stalls.
Author:
Cuisine: Indonesian
Recipe type: Dessert
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Ingredients
  • 125 g rice flour
  • 50 g sago flour
  • 4 tablespoon pandan leaves water (boil water with pandan leaves until it has green colour)
  • 2 cups water
  • salt, as needed
Other ingredients
  • 200 g palm sugar, boil with ½ cup of water until it dissolves. Strain the palm sugar water and boil again. Set your cendol aside.
  • 2 cups coconut milk. Boil and set aside to cool.
  • 1 can of jackfruit in syrup, cut into small bite-sized pieces (optional)
Instructions
  1. Mix rice flour and sago flour, then mix it with some of the water.
  2. Boil the rest of the water, add green pandan leaves water and salt.
  3. Put the flour mixtures into the boiled water.
  4. Stir well and cook until it thickens (paste-like).
  5. Drain with cendol strainer (usually the strainer has round holes), so when pressed the cendol mixture it will go out of the strainer as roundish short cendol.
  6. Put these cendol directly into a bowl with water and ice in it.
  7. Cendol will be solid and then drain them again. Set aside.
Notes
Put some cendol into a tall glass, pour palm sugar syrup and coconut milk (separate layers). You can add shaved ice or just ice cubes.
 

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