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Khanom Pang Jim Sangkhaya – Pandan Coconut Custard or Dipping Sauce

A silky smooth pandan coconut custard dipping sauce, this pandan custard is a common spread or dipping sauce for fresh breads of all sorts, waffles, fried bread sticks, and Pa Thong Ko (Thai Doughnuts).

Khanom Pang Jim Sangkhaya - Pandan Coconut Custard or Dipping Sauce
A silky smooth pandan coconut custard dipping sauce, this pandan custard is a common spread or dipping sauce for fresh breads of all sorts, waffles, fried bread sticks, and Pa Thong Ko (Thai Doughnuts).
Cuisine: Thai
Recipe type: Dessert
Ingredients
  • 2 to 3 frozen pandan leaves, thawed, rinsed, and blotted dry (see note below)
  • 1 cup coconut milk
  • 3 large egg yolks
  • ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar
  • pinch salt
  • ¾ tablespoon cornflour
  • 200g white bread, cut into 2cm cubes (sweet dinner rolls work well)
Instructions
  1. Cut the pandan leaves into 2 cm pieces and place them in a blender or food processor along with the coconut milk. Blend until smooth and strain. With a rubber spatula, press out as much liquid out of the mixture as possible. Hopefully, you’ll get one cup of the pandan-coconut milk mixture. If not, add more coconut milk or whole milk to the liquid so that it measures one cup.
  2. In a medium saucepan, whisk together the yolks, sugar, salt, and cornflour until smooth. Very slowly whisk in the pandan-coconut milk mixture. Make sure there are no lumps.
  3. Place the saucepan over medium heat and slowly bring the mixture to a gentle boil, whisking constantly. In about two minutes the mixture will thicken up to the consistency of yoghurt. When that happens, take the saucepan off the heat.
  4. Let the custard cool.
  5. In the meantime, steam the bread cubes by place them in a heatproof bowl, covered with a piece of plastic wrap, and microwaved on high for 40 to 60 seconds. Keep the bread covered.
  6. Once the dip has cooled down to slightly warmer than room temperature, transfer it to a serving bowl and serve with the steamed bread cubes or Thai doughnuts.
Notes
Pandan leaves are available frozen at most Asian grocery stores. If you can find them, you can leave them out entirely and scent the dip with a teaspoon of vanilla extract. You can also use a teaspoon of artificial pandan extract (it comes in a small glass bottle) in place of pandan leaves, if you can find it. What you should steer clear of, however, is what is labeled "pandan juice" or "pandan extract" that comes in a can. It's too diluted; its green colour is marred by oxidation; its scent is almost nonexistent; it's completely useless in this recipe.

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