Bolivian cuisine

Bolivian cuisine stems mainly from the combination of Spanish cuisine with traditional native Bolivian ingredients, with later influences from Germans, Italians, Basques, Croats, Russians, and Poles, due to the arrival of immigrants from those countries. The three traditional staples of Bolivian cuisine are corn, potatoes, and beans. These ingredients have been combined with a number of staples brought by the Spanish, such as rice, wheat, and meat, such as beef, pork, and chicken.

Aderezo de Cilantro – Coriander Dressing

A creamy Greek yoghurt based dressing ideal for those who want a tasty yet healthy option.

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Buñuelos

A Buñuelo is a fried dough ball. It is a popular snack in Argentina, Bolivia, Colombia, Cuba, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Spain, Peru, Turkey, Greece, Morocco, and is a tradition at Christmas, Ramadan and among Sephardic Jews at Hanukkah. It will usually have a filling or a topping.

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Choripán – Grilled Chorizo Sandwich

Chorípan is the clever hybrid name for one of the most popular South American sandwiches. It’s a sandwich of chorizo sausage on a crusty bread roll (chor for chorizo y pan for bread). Choripan is a popular street food that is best straight off the barbecue.

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Humitas

Humitas are an early, pre-Hispanic food that is still popular today. They are similar to Mexican tamales. Fresh corn is ground and mixed with salt and lard (and seasoning and cheese in this case), and the mixture is wrapped in corn husks and steamed. Serve them with salsa criolla.

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Marraquetas

La marraqueta is probably the most popular bread in Chile, and una marraqueta is something many Chileans enjoy every day. Marraquetas (also known as pan chileno, pan frances, and pan batido) are crusty rolls made with flour, water, yeast and salt, similar to French bread. Marraquetas are known for their distinctive shape which allows them to be easily divided into four parts.

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Salteña – Bolivian Baked Empanada

Bolivia is known for its special kind of empanada called a salteña. Oddly, the salteña takes it’s name from a city in Argentina (Salta), but it’s definitely a Bolivian specialty. You can recognise salteñas by the repulgue (the braid-like fold that seals the filling inside) which runs across the top of the pastry instead of along the side.

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Tortas Fritas – Fry Bread

Tortas fritas are quick to make and a great treat for weekend mornings as well. In Argentina and Uruguay, tortas fritas are often served with dulce de leche or jam. They are normally fried in lard, but you can substitute vegetable shortening.

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