Glossary

Beef Carpaccio

Carpaccio

Carpaccio is a dish of raw meat or fish (such as beef, veal, venison, salmon or tuna), thinly sliced or pounded thin and served mainly as an appetiser. It was invented in 1950 by Giuseppe Cipriani from Harry’s Bar in Venice and popularised during the second half of the twentieth century. It was named after Venetian painter Vittore Carpaccio. The beef was served with lemon, olive oil, and white truffle or Parmesan cheese. Later, the term was extended to dishes containing other raw meats or fish, thinly sliced and served with lemon or vinegar, olive oil, salt and ground pepper.

History

The dish, based on the Piedmont speciality carne cruda all’albese, was invented in 1950 by Giuseppe Cipriani, founder of Harry’s Bar in Venice...

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Pizza Cheese Blend

Pizza Cheese Blend

We've mixed together Mozzarella, Cheddar, and a pinch of Parmesan to create the perfect blend of cheeses that melts and stretches to perfection, without going oily, ensuring delicious authentic pizza every time.Read More
Adjarian Khachapuri

Khachapuri

Khachapuri is a traditional Georgian dish of cheese-filled bread. The bread is leavened and allowed to rise, and is shaped in various ways, usually with cheese in the middle and a crust which is ripped off and used to dip in the cheese.Read More
White Jasmine Rice

Jasmine Rice

Jasmine rice (Thai: ข้าวหอมมะลิ; rtgs: Khao hom mali; Thai pronunciation: [kʰâːw hɔ̌ːm malíʔ]; Chinese: 泰国香米; Tàiguó xiāngmǐ) is a long-grain variety of fragrant rice (also known as aromatic rice). Read More
Shungiku

Shungiku

This Asian vegetable is used to flavour salads, soups, sukiyaki and other dishes. The leaves are usually blanched briefly to soften them and deepen their color, but young leaves can be served raw. Add them to cooked dishes at the last minute, as they become bitter if overcooked.Read More
Bratwurst

Bratwurst

Bratwurst is a type of German sausage made from veal, beef, or most commonly pork. The name is derived from the Old High German Brätwurst, from brät-, finely chopped meat, and Wurst, sausage, although in modern German it is often associated with the verb braten, to pan fry or roast. While sausage recipes can be found as early as 228 AD, the first documented evidence of the Bratwurst in Germany dates back to 1313, and can be found in the Franconian city of Nuremberg, which is still an internationally renowned centre for the production of grill sausages.

A variety of Bratwürste on a stand at the Hauptmarkt in Nuremberg

A variety of Bratwürste on a stand at the Hauptmarkt in Nuremberg

Types and traditions

Germany

Recipes for the sausage vary by region and even locality; some sources list over 40 different varieties of German bratwurst, many of the best k...

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Saba Bananas

Saba Banana

Saba banana is a banana cultivar originating from the Philippines. It is primarily a cooking banana though it can also be eaten raw.Read More
Kataifi Pastry

Kataifi Pastry

Kataifi pastry, also known as shredded and bird’s nest pastry, resembles vermicelli. It is typically used to make sweet, syrup-soaked sweets, such as baklava.Read More
Catupiry

Catupiry

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CatupiryNutrition & SummarySubstitutionMore Cheeses

Catupiry is one of the most popular “requeijão” (creamy cheese) brands in Brazil.

Catupiry

Catupiry

It was developed by the Italian immigrant Mario Silvestrini in the state of Minas Gerais in 1911. The name derives from the Tupi word meaning “excellent”.

Catupiry is a soft, mild-tasting cheese that can be spread over toasts, crackers and bread buns or used in cooking. Because of its low level of acidity, catupiry has become an ingredient in various dishes.

The expression com catupiry (with catupiry) refers to foods where catupiry or an imitation is an ingredient, or a filling, such as pizzas, coxinhas or pães-de-queijo...

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Indian Rojak - Pasembor

Rojak

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RojakMore Food Items

Rojak (Malaysian and Singaporean spelling) or Rujak (Indonesian spelling) is a traditional fruit and vegetable salad dish commonly found in Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore. The term “Rojak” is Malay for mixture.

Cultural Significance

In Malaysia and Singapore, the term “rojak” is also used as a colloquial expression for an eclectic mix, in particular as a word describing the multi-ethnic character of Malaysian society.

In Indonesia, among the Javanese, rujak is an essential part of the traditional prenatal ceremony called Tujuh bulanan (literally: seventh month). Special fruit rujak is made for this occasion, and later served to the mother-to-be and her guests, primarily her female friends...

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