Serbian Pljeskavica Hamburgers

Serbian Pljeskavica Hamburgers

Pljeskavica are Serbian hamburgers popular in one form or another throughout the Balkans. The name for these meat patties comes from pljesak, a word meaning “to clap the hands,” the motion used to form these thin, large burgers. They can be made with any combination of pork, lamb and beef and can be grilled, broiled, baked or pan fried, although grilling is traditional.

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Torshi Liteh – Eggplant and Herb Pickle

Afghani Eggplant and Herb Pickle

Torshi liteh is made with eggplants and herbs (parsley, coriander, mint, tarragon, basil). Eggplants are baked in the oven, put in a glass jar with herbs and vinegar, and stored in a cool, dry place for two to three months.

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Štrudla sa Orasima – Serbian Walnut Strudel

Serbian Walnut Strudel

A number of Serbian pies are made with phyllo, called “kore” in Serbian language. A common Serbian pie not made with phyllo is called “štrudla”. To add to the confusion, it is not similar to strudel, but rather to the nut roll. Most commonly you would see two dominant varieties, sometimes made in pairs: Makovnjača (with poppy seeds) and Štrudla s orasima (with walnuts).

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Makovnjača – Poppy Seed Roll

Makovnjaca - Poppy Seed Roll

A Serbian pie could, in general, be named in two ways: according to its mode of preparation, or according to its filling (although not every pie is prepared with every filling). For example, a Bundevara is a pie filled with pumpkin and could refer to either a savijača (made of rolled filo) or a štrudla (made of rolled dough). Both sweet and salty pies are made, and some pies could be prepared in the same way with either sweet or salty filling.

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