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Hollandaise Sauce

Traditional Hollandaise sauce can be fiddly and difficult to make, especially if you do not own a double saucepan or have a cook top with inaccurate temperature gauges. This version made in a blender is foolproof and will work every time you make it.

The sauce is one of the five basic mother sauces in the French haute cuisine repertoire. Variations include – Sauce Mousseline, Herb Hollandaise, Mustard Hollandaise, and Maltaise Sauce.

Hollandaise Sauce
Traditional Hollandaise sauce can be fiddly and difficult to make, especially if you do not own a double saucepan or have a cook top with inaccurate temperature gauges. This version made in a blender is foolproof and will work every time you make it.
Ingredients
  • 3 large egg yolks
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 125g butter, melted
  • 2 tablespoons cold water
  • salt, to taste
  • freshly ground black pepper, to taste
Instructions
  1. Place the egg yolks, lemon juice, water and pepper into a blender.
  2. Blend for 20-30 seconds till light and creamy.
  3. Melt the butter in the microwave and while the blender is running, gradually add the hot butter. Continue blending for 15-20 seconds after the last of the butter has been added.
  4. Place the sauce into a saucepan and heat gently over low heat, stirring constantly until it thickens.
  5. Add salt to taste.
  6. Keep sauce warm until ready to use in a bowl over simmering water or place, covered, in the fridge until ready to use.
  7. Sauce can be reheated by microwaving on high for 10 second intervals then removed and whisked until the desired thickness is achieved (usually 20-30 seconds total). If sauce separates on reheating allow to cool slightly to reduce the temperature and whisk continuously until it recombines.
Notes
Herb Hollandaise - 1 tablespoon chopped fresh herb of your choice, chose from dill, parsley, coriander, chives. Serve with steaks or other red meat.
Mustard Hollandaise - 2 tablespoon Dijon mustard. Serve with red or white meat.
Nutrition Information
Calories: 1069 Fat: 115g Saturated fat: 69g Unsaturated fat: 38g Trans fat: 4g Carbohydrates: 4g Sugar: 1g Sodium: 198mg Fiber: 1g Protein: 9g Cholesterol: 822mg

Derivatives

Being a mother sauce, hollandaise sauce is the foundation for many derivatives created by adding or changing ingredients. The following is a non-exhaustive listing of such minor sauces.

  • The most common derivative is Sauce Béarnaise. It can be produced by replacing the acidifying agent (vinegar reduction or lemon juice) in a preparation with a strained reduction of vinegar, shallots, fresh chervil, fresh tarragon and (if to taste) crushed peppercorns. Alternatively, the flavourings may be added to a standard hollandaise. Béarnaise and its children are often used on steak or other “assertive” grilled meats and fish.
    • Sauce Choron is a variation of béarnaise without tarragon or chervil, plus added tomato purée.
    • Sauce Foyot (a.k.a. Valois) is béarnaise with meat glaze (Glace de Viande) added.
    • Sauce Colbert is Sauce Foyot with the addition of reduced white wine.
    • Sauce Café de Paris is béarnaise with curry powder added.
    • Sauce Paloise is a version of béarnaise with mint substituted for tarragon.
  • Sauce Bavaroise is hollandaise with added cream, horseradish, and thyme.
  • Sauce Crème Fleurette is hollandaise with crème fraîche added.
  • Sauce Dijon, also known as Sauce Moutarde or Sauce Girondine, is hollandaise with Dijon mustard.
  • Sauce Maltaise is hollandaise to which blanched orange zest and the juice of blood orange is added.
  • Sauce Mousseline, also known as Sauce Chantilly, is produced by folding whipped cream into hollandaise.
    • If reduced sherry is first folded into the whipped cream, the result is Sauce Divine.
    • Madame Benoît’s recipe for Mousseline uses whipped egg whites instead of whipped cream.
  • Sauce Noisette is a hollandaise variation made with browned butter (beurre noisette).[29]
  • Sauce Bearssoise is hollandaise to which lime juice and zest are added; named after John T. Bearss, who developed the Persian lime variety about 1895.
  • Sauce Texainne is hollandaise to which grapefruit juice and zest are added; named for the state of Texas and its famous grapefruit cultivars.
 
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