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Fricassée

Fricassee or fricassée is a method of cooking meat in which it is cut up, sautéed and braised, and served with its sauce, traditionally a white sauce.

Many cooking references describe fricassee simply as a French stew, usually with a white sauce. Mastering the Art of French Cooking describes it as “halfway between a saute and a stew” in that a saute has no liquid added, while a stew includes liquid from the beginning. In a fricassee, cut-up meat is first sauteed (but not browned), then liquid is added and it is simmered to finish cooking.

By the general description of frying and then braising in liquid, there are recipes for fricassee as far back as the earliest version of the medieval French cookbook Le Viandier, circa 1300. In 1490, it is first referred to specifically as “friquassee” in the print edition of Le Viandier.

Fricassee of chicken is commonly found, both in modern recipes and antique ones, but virtually all kinds of meat, poultry, fish, and even vegetables alone, can be found in fricassee dishes.

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John Doe
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Born and raised in Dublin, Ireland, John is a superior specialist in growing palms and exotic plants.
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