Krupuk

Krupuk or kerupuk (Indonesian), keropok (Malaysian), kropek (Filipino) or kroepoek (Dutch) are deep fried crackers made from starch and other ingredients that serve as flavouring. They are a popular snack in parts of Southeast Asia, but most closely associated with Indonesia and Malaysia. Kroepoek also can be found in the Netherlands, through their historic colonial ties with Indonesia.

Variety of raw unfried krupuk sold at Indonesian traditional market, Bengkulu province

Variety of raw unfried krupuk sold at Indonesian traditional market, Bengkulu province
Image Source : Wikipedia

Preparation and Consumption

To achieve maximum crunchiness, most of this pre-packed raw krupuk must be sun-dried first before being deep fried at home. To cook krupuk, a wok and plenty of very hot cooking oil is needed. Raw krupuk is quite small, hard, and darker in colour than cooked one.

Krupuk and kripik can be consumed solely as a snack, or cracked and sprinkled on top of certain food as a complement to add crispy texture. Certain Indonesian dishes such as gado-gado, karedok, rujak, asinan, bubur ayam and certain kinds of soto were known to require certain type of krupuk for toppings. Krupuk is an essential ingredient to make seblak, a savoury and spicy dish made of boiled wet krupuk cooked with protein sources (chicken, beef or seafood) in spicy sauce.

TYPES OF KRUPUK

Indonesia

Indonesia has perhaps the largest variety of krupuk. There are many variations on krupuk, many of which are made from starch with seafood (shrimp, fish, or squid), but occasionally with rice, fruits, nuts or vegetables; these variations are more usual in Southeast Asia.
Krupuk gendar (brown rice cracker) and krupuk kampung or krupuk putih (cassava starch crackers) in air-tight containers

  • Krupuk amplang, refer to pingpong balls-sized fish krupuk from Kalimantan.
  • Krupuk bawang, Garlic cracker
  • Krupuk gendar, ground rice cracker
  • Krupuk ikan, fish cracker, commonly found in Indonesia, especially seafood industry production centres, such as Palembang, Bangka, Cirebon and Sidoarjo. Wahoo is the most popular fish used to make krupuk ikan, however a more expensive variant uses belida fish / featherback knifefish.
  • Krupuk blek (also known as krupuk uyel, krupuk kampung, or krupuk putih), cassava starch cracker is ubiquitous in Indonesia
  • Krupuk kemplang, a type of flat fish cracker is particularly popular in Southern Sumatran city of Palembang
  • Krupuk kuku macan, another name of amplang with distinct “tiger nail” nugget-shaped brown-coloured fish cracker, popularly associated with Samarinda and the island of Bangka.
  • Krupuk kulit (most parts of Indonesia), Krupuk jangek (Minangkabau), or Rambak (Java), refer to cracker made from dried cattle skin, particularly popular in Minangkabau area West Sumatra.
  • Krupuk kulit babi, crispy fried pork skin, also known as pork rinds. Rarely found in Muslim majority regions in Indonesia, but common in non-Muslim majority provinces, such as Bali, North Sumatra, and North Sulawesi.
  • Krupuk mie (noodle cracker) is yellowish krupuk made from noodle-like paste usually used for asinan topping, particularly popular in Jakarta and most of markets in Java.
  • Krupuk Udang – Shrimp crackers or prawn crackers are probably the most internationally well-known variant of krupuk.

Malaysia

In Malaysia, it is called as keropok and mostly associated with fish. The most popular keropok in Malaysia is the Lekor, originated from Terengganu and Amplang from the coastal towns of Semporna and Tawau in Sabah which is also can be found in Kalimantan. Mukah town in Sarawak also historically known as a fishing town for the making of Keropok.

Other Similar Crackers

These are similar crackers, however commonly not considered as krupuk.

  • Emping is a type of cracker made from melinjo (Gnetum gnemon) nuts.
  • Rempeyek is another flour-based cracker with brittle of peanuts, anchovies or shrimp bound by crispy flour cracker.
  • Rengginang or intip (Javanese) ia rice cracker made from sun-dried and deep fried leftover rice.
  • Kripik or keripik refers to smaller bite-size crackers; the counterpart of chips (or crisps).