«

»

Vietnamese Coriander

Persicaria odorata, the Vietnamese coriander, is a herb whose leaves are used in Southeast Asian cooking.

sprig-of-vietnamese-coriander

Sprig of Vietnamese Coriander

Other English names for the herb include Vietnamese mint, Vietnamese cilantro, Cambodian mint, hot mint, and laksa leaf. Its Vietnamese name is rau răm, while in Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore it is called daun kesum, daun kesom or daun laksa. In Thailand, it is called phak phai (ผักไผ่) and the Hmong word for it is luam laws. In Laos, it is called phak phaew (ຜັກແພວ), and in Cambodia chi krasang tomhom (ជីរក្រសាំងទំហំ) or chi pong tea koun (ជីរពងទាកូន). In North-East India, Manipur state uses this as garnishing herb over various cuisines like eromba and singju. Manipuris called it as Phak-Pai.
[no_toc]
It is neither related to the mints, nor is it in the mint family Lamiaceae but the general appearance and odour are reminiscent. Persicaria is in the family Polygonaceae, collectively known as smartweeds or pinkweeds.

Uses

Flag_of_VietnamAbove all, the leaf is identified with Vietnamese cuisine, where it is commonly eaten fresh in salads (including chicken salad) and in raw summer rolls (gỏi cuốn), as well as in some soups such as canh chua and bún thang, and stews, such as fish kho tộ. It is also popularly eaten with hột vịt lộn (fertilied duck egg).

Flag_of_CambodiaIn the cuisine of Cambodia, the leaf is known as chi krasang tomhom (ជីរក្រសាំងទំហំ) and is used in soups, stews, salads, and the Cambodian summer rolls, naem (ណែម).

Flag_of_SingaporeFlag_of_MalaysiaIn Singapore and Malaysia, the shredded leaf is an essential ingredient of laksa, a spicy noodle soup, so much so that the Malay name daun laksa means “laksa leaf.”

Flag of LaosFlag of ThailandIn Laos and certain parts of Thailand the leaf is eaten with raw beef larb (Lao: ລາບ).

Flag_of_AustraliaIn Australia the plant is being investigated as a source of essential oil (kesom oil).

Substitutes

  • Mint
  • Equal parts mint and coriander
 
Comments and Feedback
 

Be the First to Comment!

Notify of
avatar
 
smilegrinwinkmrgreenneutraltwistedarrowshockunamusedcooleviloopsrazzrollcryeeklolmadsadexclamationquestionideahmmbegwhewchucklesillyenvyshutmouthapplausewhat-is-thatwell-donewant-a-tasteparty-animal
wpDiscuz
Around The Web
 
loading...
 
Hi There - We notice that you have an ad-blocker
Plenty of visitors do. All we ask is that you please consider sharing us or commenting on the post as a nice gesture.
Thank you for visiting The Taste of Aussie
Your Information will never be shared with any third party.
OR
General Profile
User Information
John Doe
Professor of Botanics
Born and raised in Dublin, Ireland, John is a superior specialist in growing palms and exotic plants.
Social rating:
OR
ARE YOU READY? GET IT NOW!
Vel eros amet amet mauris a habitasse scel erisque? Vel urna dis et, placerat phasellus, diam in! Placerat nec facilisis, tortor tristique. Arcu placerat sagittis, velit lorem scelerisque egestas placerat.
Subscribe Now
Join our weekly newsletter for more great recipes
OR
Just before you go
Please consider sharing us or commenting
on the post as a nice gesture.
Thank you for visiting The Taste of Aussie
Just before you go - please share us with your friends and followers.
Thank you for visiting
The Taste of Aussie
Subscribe Now
Join our free weekly newsletter to get the best recipes and cooking information.
OR
Recipe Newsletter
Subscribe to our ad-free newsletter and get new recipes and cooking info every weekend
Or use Social Media to Sign-up
PROBABLY THE BEST SITE
IN THE WORLD
IS GIVING YOU THE CHANCE TO SUBSCRIBE
TO PROBABLY THE BEST NEWSLETTER IN THE WORLD
OR