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Blue-Eye Trevalla

Blue-Eye Trevalla
Scientific Name :  Hyperoglyphe antarctica (Blue-eye Trevalla) Schedophilus labyrinthica (Ocean Blue-eye)
Nutrition & Summary
Amount Per Serving Size of 100g

Calories 120 Calories from Fat 9
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 1.g 2%
Saturated Fat g 0%
Trans. Fat g
Polyunsat. Fat g
Omega-3   g
Cholesterol 35mg 12%
Sodium mg 0%
Potassium mg 0%
Total Carbohydrate g 0%
Dietary Fibre g 0%
Sugars g
Protein 21g 42%

Vitamin A  0% Folate  0%
Vitamin C  0% Vitamin D  0%
Calcium  0% Iron  0%

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Flavour :  Delicate, with excellent eating qualities
Oiliness :  Medium
Moisture :  Moist
Habitat :  Saltwater - Found in deep water
Texture :  Firm - Medium to large flakes
Flesh : 
Thickness :  Thick fillets but often cut into smaller portions
Bones :  Only a few large bones and these are easily removed
Season :  Available all year, but most abundant during summer (in SA) and autumn (in Tasmania).
Size and Weight :  Average 3kg and 60cm, but commonly much larger reaching up to 50kg and 140cm.
Price :  High priced in southern states where it is very popular, medium priced in northern states where it is less well known.
Family :  Centrolophidae (trevallas).
Other Names :  Bigeye, blue-eye, blue eye, blue-eye cod, blue eye cod, blue eyed cod, deepsea trevalla, deepsea trevally, sea trevally, trevalla.
Relations :  Closely related to Warehou, distinguished from them by a golden ring around the eyes and lack of dark spots and blotches along each side of the body. Despite the similarity in common name, Blue-eye Trevalla is unrelated to Trevally.

Available all year, the blue-eye trevalla is a big, thick-bodied finfish that has gained a great following in the past twenty years. Its mildly flavoured flesh is excellent eating.

This firm-fleshed finfish lends itself well to most methods of cooking. Cut into cubes coated individually with a herbed crumb or batter mixture, blue-eye trevalla can be served in conjunction with other seafood for “baskets”, or as tasty morsels for finger food. To ensure even cooking when deep frying, use thin portions only. These can be achieved by using a butterfly cut

The emergence of blue-eye trevalla cutlets as a popular form for this finfish will give you some extra scope in preparation. With the marrying flavours of wasabi, soy and ginger, blue-eye trevalla is also superbly suited to sashimi.

Heads and frames are occasionally available. They provide tasty flesh and can be used to make an excellent soup and stock.

Buying Blue-Eye Trevalla
Blue-eyed cod are usually sold as fillets, cutlets or steaks. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for white to pale pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Storing Blue-Eye Trevalla
Make sure whole fish is scaled, gutted and cleaned thoroughly. Wrap whole fish, fillets and cutlets in plastic wrap or place in an airtight container. Refrigerate for up to 3 days or freeze whole fish for up to 6 months, and fillets, cutlets or steaks for up to 3 months, below -18ºC.

Cooking Blue-Eye Trevalla
Has a mild flavour, medium oiliness and moist, firm flesh with medium to large flakes and few bones, which are easily removed. Cut thick fillets into serving-size portions and score to allow even heat penetration. The edible skin can be left on. The centre bone of cutlets can be removed and a filling placed in the cavity. The bones make excellent stock. Smoked roe is available, mainly from Tasmania.

Best Cooking Methods for Blue-Eye Trevalla
Steam, poach, deep-fry, pan-fry, bake, grill, barbecue, raw (sashimi).

Blue-Eye Trevalla

Blue-Eye Trevalla

Blue-Eye Trevalla goes well with:
Curries, garlic, saffron, tomato, and simple accompaniments such as sautéed spinach and lemon wedges.

BLUE-EYE TREVALLA SUBSTITUTES

  • Mulloway – Many other white fleshed fish can be used in place of Blue-Eye Trevalla with ease, and Mulloway makes a suitable alternative when grilling or frying because of its mild flavour and moist flesh.
  • Coral Trout – has moist, pearly white flakes of meat. A great alternative to Blue-Eye Trevalla when steaming or poaching, as these moist methods of cookery allow the delicate flavour to shine.
  • Luderick – Though not as popular as Blue-Eye Trevalla, Luderick is just as versatile. The soft white flesh and unique flavour of Luderick will hold up well to both dry cooking methods such as grilling or BBQ’ing and gentler wet cooking methods such as steaming.
  • Silver Perch – Sold whole (gilled and gutted) and fillet forms. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh smell. In fillets, look for creamy-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell.
  • Morwong – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet form (often skinned). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for creamy pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.
  • Gemfish – A very versatile fish. With its firm to medium texture, large flake and medium flavour, it holds its shape using a range of cooking methods, including shallow frying, grilling, poaching, steaming and smoking. Deep frying and poaching help keep the flesh moist.
  • Warehou – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), and as fillets, usually skinned. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for off-white to yellowish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Roe, smoked and fresh, is also available.
  • Snapper – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), in cutlet/steak and fillet (often skinned) forms. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for cream-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.
  • Other Trevallys – Larger fish are sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet form, with yellowtail kingfish also sold as steaks and cutlets; smaller fish, such as yellowtail scad, are usually only seen whole. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for pinky-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.



 
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