Swordfish

Swordfish
Scientific Name :  Xiphias gladius
Nutrition & Summary
Amount Per Serving Size of 100g

Calories 106 Calories from Fat 19.89
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 2.21g 3%
Saturated Fat 0.88g 4%
Trans. Fat 0g
Polyunsat. Fat 0.88g
Omega-3   730g
Cholesterol 35.4mg 12%
Sodium 79.6mg 3%
Potassium 221.2mg 7%
Total Carbohydrate 0g 0%
Dietary Fibre 0g 0%
Sugars 0g
Protein 21.2g 42%

Vitamin A  0% Folate  0%
Vitamin C  0% Vitamin D  0%
Calcium  0% Iron  4%

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Flavour :  Medium
Oiliness :  Swordfish has one of the highest oil contents of any finfish.
Moisture :  Moist or medium. Quickly becomes dry when overcooked.
Habitat :  Saltwater - Inhabit the open ocean, usually offshore
Texture :  Firm
Flesh : 
Thickness :  Rarely filleted due to their size, but thick
Bones :  Usually boned-out, occasionally with obvious backbone at centre of cutlet
Season :  Available year round, with peaks in June-August.
Size and Weight :  Average 70-150kg and 1.5-3 metres (measured from tip of lower jaw to tail fin), but can grow to about 540kg and 4.5 metres.
Price :  Medium priced.
Family :  Xiphiidae (swordfishes).
Other Names :  Broadbill swordfish.
Relations :  Though similar to other billfish, such as marlin, it is the only living member of its family and has no close relatives.

Swordfish is often described as the most “meat-like” of all fishes. The steaks have very high oil content, with a dense, meaty texture and a slightly sweet taste. The flavour is not overpowering, allowing for stronger flavours to be used in its preparation. An interesting way to prepare swordfish is to poach steaks in a strong fish stock, infused with olives. Dress with dried red capsicum, dried tomatoes, olives and oven-roasted garlic, and serve on a bed of angel hair pasta with a mash of salsify. Swordfish is also suited to grilling, frying and baking.

To Buy Swordfish:
Usually sold as steaks, but also sometimes as cutlets or sashimi. Look for cream-pale pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

To Store Swordfish:
Lay in a single layer on a plate and cover with plastic wrap or place in an airtight container. Refrigerate for up to 3 days or freeze for up to 3 months below -18ºC.

To Cook Swordfish:
Average yield is 70% from trunks. Has a slightly sweet flavour, high oiliness and moist, firm flesh with fine flakes. Overcooked it quickly becomes dry. The thick skin should be removed. The centre bone of cutlets can be removed and a filling placed in the cavity.

Swordfish Cooking Methods:
Pan-fry, bake, braise, grill, barbecue, smoke, raw (sashimi), pickle. The firm flesh holds together well in soups, curries and casseroles and can be cubed for kebabs.

Swordfish

Swordfish

Swordfish goes well with:
Anchovies, capsicum, chilli, citrus, garlic, ginger, spring (green) onions, mirin, olives, olive oil, onion, sesame oil, tomato, soy sauce, vinegar, wasabi.

SWORDFISH SUBSTITUTES

Albacore – Sold whole, but more commonly as cutlets or steaks and sometimes as smoked fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for red, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any dull brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Bonito – Usually sold whole, though fishmongers will fillet it upon request; also sometimes available as sashimi. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell; flesh should be pale reddish (pale pink to white in Leaping Bonito), firm, lustrous and moist without any dull brown markings or oozing water. Always buy sashimi-grade fish if it is to be served raw or rare.

Stripped Marlin – Usually sold as steaks. Look for reddish-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Tuna – Tuna is usually sold as steaks, cutlets or sliced as sashimi. Look for pinkish red to burgundy flesh (colour varies with species and cut) that is firm, lustrous and moist without any dull brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Always buy sashimi-grade fish if it is to be served raw or rare.

Mackerel, especially Spanish Mackerel, can make a good alternative when grilling or barbecuing. The strong oily flesh can handle strong flavours to accompany, especially when charred on a BBQ. Popular accompaniments include olives, roasted vegetables, garlic and herbs.

Mahi Mahi – a large gamefish with similar “meaty” flesh to that of swordfish and marlin. It is a more sustainable alternative, well suited to preparations including grilling, barbecuing, and use in soups or curries.
[endofglossaryentry]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *