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Australian Fish and Seafood Substitution Guide

NOTE – 17th July 2017 : We are currently upgrading this page with a new format to improve readability. This should be completed by 23rd July 2017

Species GroupsAbaloneBillfishBreamsBugsClams, Cockles, PipisCrabsDoriesEmperorsFlatheadsFreshwater CrayfishFreshwater FishLeatherjacketsLingMackerelMulletMusselsOystersPrawnsRaysRockcodsRocklobstersSalmon, Trout, and CharrScallopsSea SnailsSquid, Calamari & CuttlefishTrevallysTunasWhitingsOther

Abalone : Blacklip Abalone | Greenlip Abalone
Billfish : Stripped Marlin | Swordfish
Bream : Black Bream | Frypan Bream | Pikey Bream | Snapper | Tarwhine | Yellowfin Bream
Bugs : Balmain Bug | Moreton Bay Bug
Clams, Cockles, and Pipis : Pipi | Surf Clam | Vongole
Crab : Blue Swimmer Crab | Mud Crab | Spanner Crab
Dories : John Dory | King Dory | Mirror Dory | Silver Dory
Emperors : Grass Emperor | Longnose Emperor | Redspot Emperor | Redthroat Emperor | Seabream | Spangled Emperor
Flatheads : Bluespotted Flathead | Deepwater Flathead | Dusky Flathead | Southern Sand Flathead | Tiger Flathead
Fresh Water Crayfish : Marron | Redclaw | Yabby
Freshwater Fish : Australian Bass | Barramundi | Golden Perch | Murray Cod | Silver Perch
Leatherjackets : Ocean Jacket
Ling : Pink Ling | Rock Ling
Mackerels : Blue Mackerel | Grey Mackerel | School Mackerel | Spanish Mackerel | Spotted Mackerel
Mullets : Diamondscale Mullet | Sea Mullet |
Mussels : Blue Mussel |
Oysters : Native Oyster | Pacific Oyster | Sydney Rock Oyster |
Prawns : Banana Prawn | Bay Prawn | Endeavour Prawn | King Prawn | Royal Red Prawn | School Prawn | Tiger Prawn |
Rays : Eastern Shovelnose Ray |
Rockcods : Bar Rockcod | Coral Trout | Eastern Wirrah | Goldspotted Rockcod | Longfin Perch | Yellowspotted Rockcod |
Rocklobsters : Eastern Rocklobster | Southern Rocklobster | Tropical Rocklobster | Western Rocklobster |
Salmon, Trout & Charr : Atlantic Salmon | Brook Trout (Saltwater Charr) | Chinook Salmon (King Salmon) | Rainbow Trout (Ocean Trout) |
Scallops : Commercial Scallops | Saucer Scallops |
Sea Snails 😐 Bailer Shell | Periwinkle | Trochus |
Squid, Calamari & Cuttlefish | Cuttlefish | Gould’s Squid | Loligo Squid | Luminous Bay Squid | Northern Calamari | Southern Calamari |
Trevallys : Black Pomfret | Dart | Jack Mackerel | Queenfish | Samsonfish | Silver Trevally | Yellowtail Kingfish | Yellowtail Scad |
Tunas : Albacore | Bigeye Tuna | Bonito | Longtail Tuna | Southern Bluefin Tuna | Yellowfin Tuna
Whitings : King George Whiting | Sand Whiting | School Whiting | Trumpeter Whiting | Yellowfin Whiting
Other : Octopus

Abalones have long been a valuable food source for humans in every area of the world where a species is abundant. The meat of this mollusc is considered a delicacy in certain parts of Latin America (especially Chile), France, New Zealand, Southeast Asia, and East Asia (especially in China, Vietnam, Japan, and Korea).

Main Information Article : Abalone


Blacklip Abalone

Blacklip Abalone

Blacklip Abalone

Other Names

Muttonfish

Blacklip Abalone Substitutes

Bailer Shell – Sold whole. Look for brightly coloured, intact, lustrous shells, firm flesh, and a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Squids, Calamari and Cuttlefish – Their firm texture means Squids, Calamari and Cuttlefish can also sometimes be substituted for Abalone – The meat of squid and cuttlefish is firm like that of abalone. It is also suited to similar cooking methods, requiring either a long slow cook (for as long as 3 hours) or a quick grill or fry on high heat (for as little as 3 minutes) to yield tender eating qualities. High quality fresh squid, calamari or cuttlefish can be thinly sliced to serve raw.

Octopus – The flesh of octopus is firm, but when cooked correctly is yielding and tender. It is meaty flesh, with many characteristics similar to that of Abalone. After poaching the tentacles, try slicing them and pan frying to give a result very similar to well-prepared abalone.

See Glossary : Blacklip Abalone



Greenlip Abalone

Greenlip Abalone

Greenlip Abalone

Other Names

Muttonfish

Greenlip Abalone Substitutes

Bailer Shell – Sold whole. Look for brightly coloured, intact, lustrous shells, firm flesh, and a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Squids, Calamari and Cuttlefish – Their firm texture means Squids, Calamari and Cuttlefish can also sometimes be substituted for Abalone – The meat of squid and cuttlefish is firm like that of abalone. It is also suited to similar cooking methods, requiring either a long slow cook (for as long as 3 hours) or a quick grill or fry on high heat (for as little as 3 minutes) to yield tender eating qualities. High quality fresh squid, calamari or cuttlefish can be thinly sliced to serve raw.

Octopus – The flesh of octopus is firm, but when cooked correctly is yielding and tender. It is meaty flesh, with many characteristics similar to that of Abalone. After poaching the tentacles, try slicing them and pan frying to give a result very similar to well-prepared Abalone.

See Glossary : Greenlip Abalone



Billfish make good eating fish, and are high in omega-3 oils. Blue marlin has a particularly high oil content. However, because billfish have high trophic levels, near the top of the food web, they also contain significant levels of mercury and other toxins. Pregnant women, women planning pregnancy and young children should eat shark (flake), broadbill, marlin and swordfish no more than once a fortnight and should not eat any other fish during that fortnight.The general population should also only eat shark (flake), broadbill, marlin and swordfish once per week and no other fish that week.

Main Information Article : Billfish See Article : Food Contamination – Mercury in Fish


Striped Marlin

Marlin (Striped) Tetrapturus audax

Other Names

Barred Marlin (USA)
Makajiki (Japanese)
New Zealand Marlin
Spearfish
Spikefish
Striped Swordfish

Striped Marlin Substitutes

Albacore – Sold whole, but more commonly as cutlets or steaks and sometimes as smoked fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for red, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any dull brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Bonito – Usually sold whole, though fishmongers will fillet it upon request; also sometimes available as sashimi. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell; flesh should be pale reddish (pale pink to white in Leaping Bonito), firm, lustrous and moist without any dull brown markings or oozing water. Always buy sashimi-grade fish if it is to be served raw or rare.

Swordfish – Usually sold as steaks, but also sometimes as cutlets or sashimi. Look for cream-pale pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Tuna – Tuna is usually sold as steaks, cutlets or sliced as sashimi. Look for pinkish red to burgundy flesh (colour varies with species and cut) that is firm, lustrous and moist without any dull brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Always buy sashimi-grade fish if it is to be served raw or rare.

Mackerel (especially Spanish Mackerel) – Can make a good alternative when grilling or barbecuing. The strong oily flesh can handle strong flavours to accompany, especially when charred on a BBQ. Popular accompaniments include olives, roasted vegetables, garlic and herbs.

Mahi Mahi – A large gamefish with similar “meaty” flesh to that of swordfish and marlin. It is a more sustainable alternative, well suited to preparations including grilling, barbecuing, and use in soups or curries.

See Glossary : Striped Marlin



Swordfish

Swordfish

Other Names

Broadbill Swordfish

Swordfish Substitutes

Albacore – Sold whole, but more commonly as cutlets or steaks and sometimes as smoked fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for red, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any dull brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Bonito – Usually sold whole, though fishmongers will fillet it upon request; also sometimes available as sashimi. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell; flesh should be pale reddish (pale pink to white in Leaping Bonito), firm, lustrous and moist without any dull brown markings or oozing water. Always buy sashimi-grade fish if it is to be served raw or rare.

Stripped Marlin – Usually sold as steaks. Look for reddish-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Tuna – Tuna is usually sold as steaks, cutlets or sliced as sashimi. Look for pinkish red to burgundy flesh (colour varies with species and cut) that is firm, lustrous and moist without any dull brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Always buy sashimi-grade fish if it is to be served raw or rare.

Mackerel (especially Spanish Mackerel) – Can make a good alternative when grilling or barbecuing. The strong oily flesh can handle strong flavours to accompany, especially when charred on a BBQ. Popular accompaniments include olives, roasted vegetables, garlic and herbs.

Mahi Mahi – A large gamefish with similar “meaty” flesh to that of swordfish and marlin. It is a more sustainable alternative, well suited to preparations including grilling, barbecuing, and use in soups or curries.

See Glossary : Swordfish



Bream are found in shallow tropical and sub-tropical waters all over the world; their family, Sparidae, is large, with over 125 species. Commonly called sea bream to distinguish them from the European freshwater bream, they’re also known as porgies in North America.

Main Information Article : Bream


Black Bream

Black Bream

Other Names

Gippsland Bream
Golden Bream
Silver Bream
Southern Black Bream
Southern Bream
Southern Yellowfin Bream

Black Bream Substitutes

Emperors – Emperors are sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for yellowish-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell (seabream can occasionally have a distinctly iodiney aroma).

Morwong – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet form (often skinned). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for creamy pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Seaperches – Sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pinkish-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

See Glossary : Striped Marlin



Frypan Bream

Frypan Bream

Other Names

Frypan Snapper
King Soldierbream
Longfin Snapper
Longspine Snapper

Frypan Bream Substitutes

Emperors – Emperors are sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for yellowish-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell (seabream can occasionally have a distinctly iodine aroma).

Morwong – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet form (often skinned). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for creamy pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Seaperches – Sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pinkish-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

See Glossary : Striped Marlin



Pikey Bream

Pikey bream

Other Names

Black Bream
Picnic Seabream

Pikey Bream Substitutes

Emperors – Emperors are sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for yellowish-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell (seabream can occasionally have a distinctly iodiney aroma).

Morwong – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet form (often skinned). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for creamy pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Seaperches – Sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pinkish-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

See Glossary : Striped Marlin



Snapper

Snapper Pagrus auratus

Other Names

Australasian snapper
Cockney
Cockney bream
Old man snapper
Pink snapper
Pinkies
Red bream
Schnapper
Squire
Previously known by the Latin name Chrysophrys auratus

Snapper Substitutes

Blue-Eye Trevalla – Available all year, the blue-eye trevalla is a big, thick-bodied finfish that has gained a great following in the past twenty years. Its mildly flavoured flesh is excellent eating. This firm-fleshed finfish lends itself well to most methods of cooking.

Goldband Snapper – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), in cutlet/steak and fillet forms. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets and fillets, look for creamy pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. If purchasing “snapper fillets”, clarify whether they are “true” Snapper (a type of Bream) or a Tropical Snapper, such as Goldband Snapper.

Mulloway – Well regarded eating fish with firm white flesh and few bones. Small fish are popular to roast or BBQ whole, but some can be soapy. Medium sized fish have a nice large flake and remain moist when grilled or fried. Larger fish can be dry and are better suited to soups, curries and other wet dishes.

Pearl Perch – The east coast relative of the much acclaimed West Australian dhufish. Caught between Rockhampton and Sydney, it has thick, moist, flesh with a sweet, delicate flavour and is an excellent fish for steaming.

Red Emperor – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), as trunks (headless) and fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for yellowish-white to pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Queenfish – Sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pale reddish-brown, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

See Glossary : Striped Marlin



Tarwhine

Tarwhine Rhabdosargus sarba

Other Names

Silver Bream
Bream

Tarwine Substitutes

Emperors (such as Grass, Longnose, Redspot, Redthroat and Spangled) – Emperors are sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for yellowish-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell (seabream can occasionally have a distinctly iodiney aroma).

Morwong – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet form (often skinned). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for creamy pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Tropical Snappers (such as Goldband, King and Ruby Snappers, and Green Jobfish) – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), in cutlet/steak and fillet forms. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets and fillets, look for creamy pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. If purchasing “snapper fillets”, clarify whether they are “true” Snapper (a type of Bream) or a Tropical Snapper, such as Goldband Snapper.

See Glossary : Striped Marlin



Yellowfin Bream

Yellowfin Bream Acanthopagrus australis

Other Names

Black bream
Sea bream
Silver bream
Surf bream

Yellowfin Bream Substitutes

Emperors – Emperors are sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for yellowish-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell (seabream can occasionally have a distinctly iodine aroma).

Morwong – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet form (often skinned). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for creamy pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Seaperches – Sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pinkish-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

See Glossary : Striped Marlin



Balmain Bug

Balmain Bug Ibacus peronii

Other Names

Bug
Flapjack
Flying Saucer
Sand Lobster
Shovelnose Lobster
Shovel-nosed Lobster
Slipper Lobster
Southern Baylobster
Southern Bay Lobster
Squagga
Squat Lobster

Balmain Bug Substitutes

Marron – Sold whole live or cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Marron as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Moreton Bay Bugs – Sold whole, sometimes live (and frozen whole, tails and as meat). Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Redclaw – Sold mostly whole live, and occasionally cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Redclaw as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Prawns – Prawns are highly perishable in their raw state and so are often frozen or boiled at sea as soon as they are caught. If cooking with Prawns, buy green (raw) Prawns, as cooked Prawns will toughen if reheated. Whether buying cooked or raw Prawns look for firmly attached heads and tight, firm shells with a good sheen. There shouldn’t be any blackening around the head or legs as this is a sign of oxidation, and they should have a pleasant “fresh sea” smell. Buy 1kg of Prawns in the shell to get about 500g of Prawn meat.

Yabby – Sold whole live or cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Yabbies as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Moreton Bay Bug

Moreton Bay Bug

Other Names

Baylobster
Bay Lobster
Bug
Flathead Lobster
Gulf-lobster
Mudbug
Northern Baylobster
Northern Bay Lobster
Sandbug
Shovelnose Lobster
Shovel-nosed Lobster
Slipper Lobster
Squat Lobster
Squilla

Moreton Bay Bug Substitutes

Balmain Bug – Sold whole, sometimes live (and frozen whole, tails and as meat). Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Marron – Sold whole live or cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Marron as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Redclaw – Sold mostly whole live, and occasionally cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Redclaw as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Prawns – Prawns are highly perishable in their raw state and so are often frozen or boiled at sea as soon as they are caught. If cooking with Prawns, buy green (raw) Prawns, as cooked Prawns will toughen if reheated. Whether buying cooked or raw Prawns look for firmly attached heads and tight, firm shells with a good sheen. There shouldn’t be any blackening around the head or legs as this is a sign of oxidation, and they should have a pleasant “fresh sea” smell. Buy 1kg of Prawns in the shell to get about 500g of Prawn meat.

Yabby – Sold whole live or cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Yabbies as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

See Glossary : Moreton Bay Bug


Pipi

Pipis

Other Names

Beach Pipi
Clam
Coorong Cockle
Eugarie
Goolwa Cockle
Pippie
Ugari

Pipi Substitutes

Blue Mussels – Sold live. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells that are closed or close when tapped or gently squeezed, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Tiny crabs are sometimes found inside Mussels, they are harmless and do not indicate any problem with the Mussel.

Surf Clams – Sold live. Look for brightly coloured, intact, lustrous shells, that are closed or close when tapped or gently squeezed, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Due to their sandy habitat they can contain a bit of grit, ask your fishmonger if they have been purged (stored in aerated saltwater for at least 24 hours to eliminate sand), if they haven’t been, see Purging Instructions.

Vongole – Sold live. Look for brightly coloured, intact, lustrous shells, that are closed or close when tapped or gently squeezed, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Due to their sandy habitat they can contain a bit of grit, ask your fishmonger if they have been purged (stored in aerated saltwater for at least 24 hours to eliminate sand), if they haven’t been, see Purging Instructions.

See Glossary : Pipi


Surf Clam

Surf Clam

Other Names

Content
Content
Content

Clam
Dosinia
SURF CLAM Substitutes

Blue Mussels – Sold live. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells that are closed or close when tapped or gently squeezed, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Tiny crabs are sometimes found inside Mussels, they are harmless and do not indicate any problem with the mussel.

Pipis – Sold live. Look for brightly coloured, intact, lustrous shells, that are closed or close when tapped or gently squeezed, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Due to their sandy habitat they can contain quite a bit of grit, ask your fishmonger if they have been purged (stored in aerated saltwater for at least 24 hours to eliminate sand), if they haven’t been, see Purging Instructions.

Vongole – Sold live. Look for brightly coloured, intact, lustrous shells, that are closed or close when tapped or gently squeezed, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Due to their sandy habitat they can contain a bit of grit, ask your fishmonger if they have been purged (stored in aerated saltwater for at least 24 hours to eliminate sand), if they haven’t been, see Purging Instructions.

There are over 20 closely-related species of Surf Clams found around the Australian coast (distinguished by quantity and prominence of ridging, colour and size), but few are large enough to be worth harvesting or eating.



Vongole

Vongole

Other Names

Content
Content
Content

Clam
Sand Cockle
Vongoli

VONGOLE Substitutes

Blue Mussels – Sold live. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells that are closed or close when tapped or gently squeezed, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Tiny crabs are sometimes found inside Mussels, they are harmless and do not indicate any problem with the mussel.

Pipis – Sold live. Look for brightly coloured, intact, lustrous shells, that are closed or close when tapped or gently squeezed, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Due to their sandy habitat they can contain quite a bit of grit, ask your fishmonger if they have been purged (stored in aerated saltwater for at least 24 hours to eliminate sand), if they haven’t been, see Purging Instructions.

Strawberry Cockles (Notocallista kingie) – occasionally seen in retail shops or harvested recreationally in various parts of Australia

Surf Clams – Sold live. Look for brightly coloured, intact, lustrous shells, that are closed or close when tapped or gently squeezed, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Due to their sandy habitat they can contain a bit of grit, ask your fishmonger if they have been purged (stored in aerated saltwater for at least 24 hours to eliminate sand), if they haven’t been, see Purging Instructions.
See Glossary : xxxxxxxx


Blue Swimmer Crab

Blue Swimmer Crab Portunus pelagicus

Other Names

Content
Content
Content

Blue Crab
Blue Manna Crab
Bluey
Sand Crab
Sandy

BLUE SWIMMER CRAB Substitutes

Marron – Sold whole live or cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Marron as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Mud Crab – They can survive well out of water for days and are mostly sold live, but are also available cooked. It is best not to buy dead uncooked Mud Crabs as it is difficult to determine their quality. Crabs should feel heavy for their size and have their legs and claws intact. Look for firm, intact shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible, give them a gentle shake to ensure there’s no sound of sloshing water.

Redclaw – Sold mostly whole live, and occasionally cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Redclaw as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Rocklobster – Rocklobsters are usually sold live, as frozen green tails, or cooked whole (frozen or chilled). If possible buy live, in which case they should be lively with a hard shell (indicating that they haven’t recently moulted) and all limbs and antennae should be intact. Avoid green (raw dead) Rocklobsters (except for frozen tails) as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead for and the flesh deteriorates very quickly. In cooked Rocklobsters, look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. They should feel heavy for their size and their tails should be tightly curled.

Spanner Crab – They are usually sold cooked, but are occasionally available live. It is best not to buy dead uncooked Spanner Crabs, as it’s difficult to tell how long they’ve been dead. Crabs should feel heavy for their size and have their legs and claws intact. Look for firm, intact shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible, give them a gentle shake to ensure there’s no sound of sloshing water. Males are larger and more common than females. Females with eggs are protected.

Yabby – Sold whole live or cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Yabbies as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.



Mud Crab

Mud Crab

Other Names

Black Crab
Green Crab
Mangrove Crab
Muddie
Muddy
Green Crab (Giant)
Brown Mud Crab (Orange)

Mud Crab Substitutes

Blue Swimmer Crab –

Marron – Sold whole live or cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Marron as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Redclaw – Sold mostly whole live, and occasionally cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Redclaw as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Rocklobster – Rocklobsters are usually sold live, as frozen green tails, or cooked whole (frozen or chilled). If possible buy live, in which case they should be lively with a hard shell (indicating that they haven’t recently moulted) and all limbs and antennae should be intact. Avoid green (raw dead) Rocklobsters (except for frozen tails) as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead for and the flesh deteriorates very quickly. In cooked Rocklobsters, look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. They should feel heavy for their size and their tails should be tightly curled.

Spanner Crab – They are usually sold cooked, but are occasionally available live. It is best not to buy dead uncooked Spanner Crabs, as it’s difficult to tell how long they’ve been dead. Crabs should feel heavy for their size and have their legs and claws intact. Look for firm, intact shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible, give them a gentle shake to ensure there’s no sound of sloshing water. Males are larger and more common than females. Females with eggs are protected.

Yabby – Sold whole live or cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Yabbies as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.



Spanner Crab

Spanner crab Ranina ranina

Other Names

Frog Crab
Red Frog Crab
Kona Crab (USA)

Spanner Crab Substitutes

Blue Swimmer Crab

Marron – Sold whole live or cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Marron as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Redclaw – Sold mostly whole live, and occasionally cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Redclaw as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Rocklobster – Rocklobsters are usually sold live, as frozen green tails, or cooked whole (frozen or chilled). If possible buy live, in which case they should be lively with a hard shell (indicating that they haven’t recently moulted) and all limbs and antennae should be intact. Avoid green (raw dead) Rocklobsters (except for frozen tails) as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead for and the flesh deteriorates very quickly. In cooked Rocklobsters, look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. They should feel heavy for their size and their tails should be tightly curled.

Mud Crab

Yabby – Sold whole live or cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Yabbies as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

See Glossary : Spanner Crab


John Dory

John Dory

Other Names

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Doorkeeper’s Fish
Dory Keparu
Kuparu
St Peter’s Fish

JOHN DORY Substitutes

Other Dories or Oreodories – Dories are sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form (usually skin on, as the most highly prized, John dory, is identified by the dark spot on its side). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. John dory flesh is white, whereas mirror dory has a pink tinge and silver and king dories are slightly yellowish. Oreodories, members of a closely related family, belong to the same order as dories, Zeiformes. They have rougher, darker skin, larger eyes and more elongated bodies than dories. They are less expensive than dories and generally considered inferior to them, though they are still good eating and can be substituted for dories in recipes. They have a thick skin, which is best removed, and a slightly firmer texture than dories.

Flounder – Flounders are sold as a whole fish (or sometimes as thin fillets and usually skinned, although the skin is edible). Whole flounder is good sautéed, steamed or roasted. Fillets are excellent sautéed with a coating of flour or light breading to crisp the soft flesh and prevent them from falling apart.

Sole – While they are two different types of fish, both sole and flounder taste the same and have the same nutritional make up. They are sold as a whole fish (or sometimes as thin fillets and usually skinned, although the skin is edible). Whole flounder is good sautéed, steamed or roasted. Fillets are excellent sautéed with a coating of flour or light breading to crisp the soft flesh and prevent them from falling apart.

Whitings – Whiting are sold whole (gilled and gutted), as trunks (headless), and in single and butterflied fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Sand and Yellowfin Whitings tend to naturally have a faintly yellow hue to their flesh.

King Dory

King Dory

Other Names

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Horsehead
Lookdown Dory
McCulloch’s Dory
Shadow Dory

KING DORY Substitutes

Other Dories or Oreodories – Dories are sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form (usually skin on, as the most highly prized, John dory, is identified by the dark spot on its side). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. John dory flesh is white, whereas mirror dory has a pink tinge and silver and king dories are slightly yellowish. Oreodories, members of a closely related family, belong to the same order as dories, Zeiformes. They have rougher, darker skin, larger eyes and more elongated bodies than dories. They are less expensive than dories and generally considered inferior to them, though they are still good eating and can be substituted for dories in recipes. They have a thick skin, which is best removed, and a slightly firmer texture than dories.

Flounder – Flounders are sold as a whole fish (or sometimes as thin fillets and usually skinned, although the skin is edible). Whole flounder is good sautéed, steamed or roasted. Fillets are excellent sautéed with a coating of flour or light breading to crisp the soft flesh and prevent them from falling apart.

Sole – While they are two different types of fish, both sole and flounder taste the same and have the same nutritional make up. They are sold as a whole fish (or sometimes as thin fillets and usually skinned, although the skin is edible). Whole flounder is good sautéed, steamed or roasted. Fillets are excellent sautéed with a coating of flour or light breading to crisp the soft flesh and prevent them from falling apart.

Whitings – Whiting are sold whole (gilled and gutted), as trunks (headless), and in single and butterflied fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Sand and Yellowfin Whitings tend to naturally have a faintly yellow hue to their flesh.

Mirror Dory

Mirror Dory

Other Names

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Deepsea Dory
Deepwater Dory
Silver Dory
Trawl Dory

MIRROR DORY Substitutes

Other Dories or Oreodories – Dories are sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form (usually skin on, as the most highly prized, John dory, is identified by the dark spot on its side). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. John dory flesh is white, whereas mirror dory has a pink tinge and silver and king dories are slightly yellowish. Oreodories, members of a closely related family, belong to the same order as dories, Zeiformes. They have rougher, darker skin, larger eyes and more elongated bodies than dories. They are less expensive than dories and generally considered inferior to them, though they are still good eating and can be substituted for dories in recipes. They have a thick skin, which is best removed, and a slightly firmer texture than dories.

Flounder – Flounders are sold as a whole fish (or sometimes as thin fillets and usually skinned, although the skin is edible). Whole flounder is good sautéed, steamed or roasted. Fillets are excellent sautéed with a coating of flour or light breading to crisp the soft flesh and prevent them from falling apart.

Sole – While they are two different types of fish, both sole and flounder taste the same and have the same nutritional make up. They are sold as a whole fish (or sometimes as thin fillets and usually skinned, although the skin is edible). Whole flounder is good sautéed, steamed or roasted. Fillets are excellent sautéed with a coating of flour or light breading to crisp the soft flesh and prevent them from falling apart.

Whitings – Whiting are sold whole (gilled and gutted), as trunks (headless), and in single and butterflied fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Sand and Yellowfin Whitings tend to naturally have a faintly yellow hue to their flesh

Silver Dory

Silver Dory

Other Names

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Bastard Dory
Red Dory
Sun Dory

SILVER DORY Substitutes

Other Dories or Oreodories – Dories are sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form (usually skin on, as the most highly prized, John dory, is identified by the dark spot on its side). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. John dory flesh is white, whereas mirror dory has a pink tinge and silver and king dories are slightly yellowish. Oreodories, members of a closely related family, belong to the same order as dories, Zeiformes. They have rougher, darker skin, larger eyes and more elongated bodies than dories. They are less expensive than dories and generally considered inferior to them, though they are still good eating and can be substituted for dories in recipes. They have a thick skin, which is best removed, and a slightly firmer texture than dories.

Flounder – Flounders are sold as a whole fish (or sometimes as thin fillets and usually skinned, although the skin is edible). Whole flounder is good sautéed, steamed or roasted. Fillets are excellent sautéed with a coating of flour or light breading to crisp the soft flesh and prevent them from falling apart.

Sole – While they are two different types of fish, both sole and flounder taste the same and have the same nutritional make up. They are sold as a whole fish (or sometimes as thin fillets and usually skinned, although the skin is edible). Whole flounder is good sautéed, steamed or roasted. Fillets are excellent sautéed with a coating of flour or light breading to crisp the soft flesh and prevent them from falling apart.

Whitings – Whiting are sold whole (gilled and gutted), as trunks (headless), and in single and butterflied fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Sand and Yellowfin Whitings tend to naturally have a faintly yellow hue to their flesh
See Glossary : xxxxxxxx


Grass Emperor

Grass Emperor

Other Names

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Blue-lined Emperor
Brown Sweetlip
Coral Bream
Emperor
Grass Sweetlip
Snapper Bream

GRASS EMPEROR Substitutes

Other Emperors (including Grass, Longnose, Redthroat And Spangled Emperors And Seabream) – Emperors are sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for yellowish-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell (seabream can occasionally have a distinctly iodine aroma).

Coral Trout – Among the most sought-after reef fishes for their impressive appearance and fine eating qualities. Their delicate flavour and fine, white flakes appeal to most.

Crimson Snapper – The firm, flaky texture and sweet, mild flavour of crimson snapper rivals that of the more well-known red snapper and is becoming increasingly popular. From ceviche to a simple pan-fry, crimson snapper adapts well to a wide range of cooking methods.

Goldband, Moses, Ruby, Saddletail and Stripey Snapper – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), in cutlet/steak and fillet forms. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets and fillets, look for creamy pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. If purchasing “snapper fillets”, clarify whether they are “true” Snapper (a type of Bream) or a Tropical Snapper, such as Goldband Snapper.

Green Jobfish –

Hussar –

Rosy Snapper –

Mangrove Jack –

Redfish – Sometimes sold whole, due to their tough scales however they are usually seen in skinless fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pale pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Red Emperor – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), as trunks (headless) and fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for yellowish-white to pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Snapper – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), in cutlet/steak and fillet (often skinned) forms. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for cream-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Striped Trumpeter –

.

Longnose Emperor

LONGNOSE EMPEROR

Other Names

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Emperor
Longnose Emperor
Longnose Sweetlip

LONGNOSE EMPEROR Substitutes

Other Emperors (including Grass, Longnose, Redthroat And Spangled Emperors And Seabream) – Emperors are sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for yellowish-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell (seabream can occasionally have a distinctly iodine aroma).

Coral Trout – Among the most sought-after reef fishes for their impressive appearance and fine eating qualities. Their delicate flavour and fine, white flakes appeal to most.

Crimson Snapper – The firm, flaky texture and sweet, mild flavour of crimson snapper rivals that of the more well-known red snapper and is becoming increasingly popular. From ceviche to a simple pan-fry, crimson snapper adapts well to a wide range of cooking methods.

Goldband, Moses, Ruby, Saddletail and Stripey Snapper – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), in cutlet/steak and fillet forms. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets and fillets, look for creamy pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. If purchasing “snapper fillets”, clarify whether they are “true” Snapper (a type of Bream) or a Tropical Snapper, such as Goldband Snapper.

Green Jobfish –

Hussar –

Rosy Snapper –

Mangrove Jack –

Redfish – Sometimes sold whole, due to their tough scales however they are usually seen in skinless fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pale pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Red Emperor – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), as trunks (headless) and fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for yellowish-white to pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Snapper – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), in cutlet/steak and fillet (often skinned) forms. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for cream-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Striped Trumpeter –


Redspot Emperor

Redspot Emperor

Other Names

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Emperor
Pink-eared Emperor
Pinkear Sweetlip
Purple-eared Emperor
Purple-headed Emperor
Purplehead Emperor
Red-ear Emperor

REDSPOT EMPEROR Substitutes

Other Emperors (including Grass, Longnose, Redthroat And Spangled Emperors And Seabream) – Emperors are sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for yellowish-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell (seabream can occasionally have a distinctly iodine aroma).

Coral Trout – Among the most sought-after reef fishes for their impressive appearance and fine eating qualities. Their delicate flavour and fine, white flakes appeal to most.

Crimson Snapper – The firm, flaky texture and sweet, mild flavour of crimson snapper rivals that of the more well-known red snapper and is becoming increasingly popular. From ceviche to a simple pan-fry, crimson snapper adapts well to a wide range of cooking methods.

Goldband, Moses, Ruby, Saddletail and Stripey Snapper – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), in cutlet/steak and fillet forms. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets and fillets, look for creamy pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. If purchasing “snapper fillets”, clarify whether they are “true” Snapper (a type of Bream) or a Tropical Snapper, such as Goldband Snapper.

Green Jobfish –

Hussar –

Rosy Snapper –

Mangrove Jack –

Redfish – Sometimes sold whole, due to their tough scales however they are usually seen in skinless fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pale pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Red Emperor – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), as trunks (headless) and fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for yellowish-white to pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Snapper – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), in cutlet/steak and fillet (often skinned) forms. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for cream-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Striped Trumpeter –

Redthroat Emperor

Redthroat Emperor

Other Names

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Lipper
Northwest Snapper
Red-throat
Redthroat
Sweetlip
Sweetlip Emperor
Tricky Snapper
Trout
Trumpeter

REDTHROAT EMPEROR Substitutes

Other emperors (including grass, longnose, redspot and spangled emperors and seabream)

Coral Trout – Among the most sought-after reef fishes for their impressive appearance and fine eating qualities. Their delicate flavour and fine, white flakes appeal to most.

Crimson Snapper – The firm, flaky texture and sweet, mild flavour of crimson snapper rivals that of the more well-known red snapper and is becoming increasingly popular. From ceviche to a simple pan-fry, crimson snapper adapts well to a wide range of cooking methods.

Goldband, Moses, Ruby, Saddletail and Stripey Snapper – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), in cutlet/steak and fillet forms. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets and fillets, look for creamy pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. If purchasing “snapper fillets”, clarify whether they are “true” Snapper (a type of Bream) or a Tropical Snapper, such as Goldband Snapper.

Green Jobfish –

Hussar –

Rosy Snapper –

Mangrove Jack –

Redfish – Sometimes sold whole, due to their tough scales however they are usually seen in skinless fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pale pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Red Emperor – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), as trunks (headless) and fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for yellowish-white to pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Snapper – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), in cutlet/steak and fillet (often skinned) forms. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for cream-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Striped Trumpeter –


Seabream

Seabream

Other Names

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Bigeye Bream
Big-eye Bream
Blue-lined Sea-bream
Collared sea-bream
Coral Bream
Iodine Bream
Japanese Sea Bream
Naked-headed Sea-Bream
Pale-faced Bream
Sand Snapper
Sea-bream
Spotted Sea Bream
Swallowtail Sea-bream

SEABREAM Substitutes

Other Emperors (including Grass, Longnose, Redspot, Redthroat And Spangled Emperors),

Crimson Snapper – The firm, flaky texture and sweet, mild flavour of crimson snapper rivals that of the more well-known red snapper and is becoming increasingly popular. From ceviche to a simple pan-fry, crimson snapper adapts well to a wide range of cooking methods.

Goldband, Moses, Ruby, Saddletail and Stripey Snapper – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), in cutlet/steak and fillet forms. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets and fillets, look for creamy pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. If purchasing “snapper fillets”, clarify whether they are “true” Snapper (a type of Bream) or a Tropical Snapper, such as Goldband Snapper.

Green Jobfish –

Hussar –

Rosy Snapper –

Mangrove Jack –

Redfish – Sometimes sold whole, due to their tough scales however they are usually seen in skinless fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pale pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Red Emperor – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), as trunks (headless) and fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for yellowish-white to pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Snapper – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), in cutlet/steak and fillet (often skinned) forms. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for cream-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Striped Trumpeter –


Spangled Emperor

Spangled Emperor

Other Names

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Blue-lined Emperor
Blueline Emperor
Blue-spotted Emperor
Nor-west Snapper
North West Snapper
Sand Snapper
Tricky Snapper
Yellow Sweetlip

SPANGLED EMPEROR Substitutes

Other emperors (including grass, longnose, redspot and redthroat emperors and seabream)

Coral Trout – Among the most sought-after reef fishes for their impressive appearance and fine eating qualities. Their delicate flavour and fine, white flakes appeal to most.

Crimson Snapper – The firm, flaky texture and sweet, mild flavour of crimson snapper rivals that of the more well-known red snapper and is becoming increasingly popular. From ceviche to a simple pan-fry, crimson snapper adapts well to a wide range of cooking methods.

Goldband, Moses, Ruby, Saddletail and Stripey Snapper – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), in cutlet/steak and fillet forms. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets and fillets, look for creamy pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. If purchasing “snapper fillets”, clarify whether they are “true” Snapper (a type of Bream) or a Tropical Snapper, such as Goldband Snapper.

Green Jobfish –

Hussar –

Rosy Snapper –

Mangrove Jack –

Redfish – Sometimes sold whole, due to their tough scales however they are usually seen in skinless fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pale pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Red Emperor – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), as trunks (headless) and fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for yellowish-white to pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Snapper – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), in cutlet/steak and fillet (often skinned) forms. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for cream-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Striped Trumpeter –
See Glossary : xxxxxxxx


Bluespotted Flathead

Flathead (Bluespotted)

Other Names

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Blue Spot Flathead
Bluespot Flathead
Blue-spotted Flathead
Drift Flathead
Eastern Blue Spot Flathead
Eastern Blue-spotted Flathead
Long Nosed Flathead
Longnose Flathead
Long-nosed Flathead
Red Spotted Flathead
Red-spotted Flathead
Sand Flathead
Shovelnose Flathead
Yank Flathead

BLUESPOTTED FLATHEAD Substitutes

Bream – Breams are generally sold whole (gilled and gutted), only occasionally as fillets, usually already skinned. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Hussar – Moist, firm flesh with a sweet sea taste. Very similar to Striped Snapper, Good eating!

Morwong – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet form (often skinned). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for creamy pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Redfish – Sometimes sold whole, due to their tough scales however they are usually seen in skinless fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pale pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Tarwhine – Sold mainly whole (gilled and gutted) and occasionally in fillet form (usually skinned). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pale pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh with some dark veins and without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Whiting – Whiting are sold whole (gilled and gutted), as trunks (headless), and in single and butterflied fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Sand and Yellowfin Whitings tend to naturally have a faintly yellow hue to their flesh.

Deepwater Flathead

Deepwater Flathead

Other Names

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Deep Sea Flathead
Flathead
Trawl Flathead

DEEPWATER FLATHEAD Substitutes

Bream – Breams are generally sold whole (gilled and gutted), only occasionally as fillets, usually already skinned. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Hussar – Moist, firm flesh with a sweet sea taste. Very similar to Striped Snapper, Good eating!

Morwong – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet form (often skinned). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for creamy pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Redfish – Sometimes sold whole, due to their tough scales however they are usually seen in skinless fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pale pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Tarwhine – Sold mainly whole (gilled and gutted) and occasionally in fillet form (usually skinned). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pale pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh with some dark veins and without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Whiting – Whiting are sold whole (gilled and gutted), as trunks (headless), and in single and butterflied fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Sand and Yellowfin Whitings tend to naturally have a faintly yellow hue to their flesh.<


 

Dusky Flathead

Flathead (Dusky) Platycephalus fuscus

Other Names

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Black Flathead
Dusky
Estuary Flathead
Flathead
Flattie
Frog
Lizard
Mud Flathead
River Flathead

DUSKY FLATHEAD Substitutes

Bream – Breams are generally sold whole (gilled and gutted), only occasionally as fillets, usually already skinned. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Hussar – Moist, firm flesh with a sweet sea taste. Very similar to Striped Snapper, Good eating!

Morwong – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet form (often skinned). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for creamy pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Redfish – Sometimes sold whole, due to their tough scales however they are usually seen in skinless fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pale pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Tarwhine – Sold mainly whole (gilled and gutted) and occasionally in fillet form (usually skinned). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pale pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh with some dark veins and without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Whiting – Whiting are sold whole (gilled and gutted), as trunks (headless), and in single and butterflied fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Sand and Yellowfin Whitings tend to naturally have a faintly yellow hue to their flesh.

Southern Sand Flathead

Southern Sand Flathead

Other Names

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Sand Flathead
Bay Flathead
Cliff Flathead
Common Flathead
Sandy Flathead
Slimy Flathead.

SOUTHERN SAND FLATHEAD Substitutes

Bream – Breams are generally sold whole (gilled and gutted), only occasionally as fillets, usually already skinned. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Hussar – Moist, firm flesh with a sweet sea taste. Very similar to Striped Snapper, Good eating!

Morwong – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet form (often skinned). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for creamy pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Redfish – Sometimes sold whole, due to their tough scales however they are usually seen in skinless fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pale pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Tarwhine – Sold mainly whole (gilled and gutted) and occasionally in fillet form (usually skinned). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pale pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh with some dark veins and without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Whiting – Whiting are sold whole (gilled and gutted), as trunks (headless), and in single and butterflied fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Sand and Yellowfin Whitings tend to naturally have a faintly yellow hue to their flesh.

Tiger Flathead

Flathead (Tiger) Neoplatycephalus richardsoni

Other Names

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Deep Sea Flathead
Flathead
King Flathead
Spiky Flathead
Trawl Flathead

TIGER FLATHEAD Substitutes

Other Flathead – Flatheads are sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for yellowish-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings (dark veining may be visible in some species) or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Bream – Breams are generally sold whole (gilled and gutted), only occasionally as fillets, usually already skinned. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Hussar – Moist, firm flesh with a sweet sea taste. Very similar to Striped Snapper, Good eating!

Morwong – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet form (often skinned). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for creamy pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Redfish – Sometimes sold whole, due to their tough scales however they are usually seen in skinless fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pale pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Tarwhine – Sold mainly whole (gilled and gutted) and occasionally in fillet form (usually skinned). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pale pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh with some dark veins and without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Whiting – Whiting are sold whole (gilled and gutted), as trunks (headless), and in single and butterflied fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Sand and Yellowfin Whitings tend to naturally have a faintly yellow hue to their flesh
See Glossary : xxxxxxxx


Marron

Marron

Other Names

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Hairy Marron (Margaret River)
West Australian Marron

MARRON Substitutes

Crabs – Regardless of the type of Crab, look for ones which feel heavy for their size and have their legs and claws intact. With dead Crabs, if possible, give them a gentle shake to ensure there’s no sound of sloshing water. Live Crabs should be vigorous.

Prawns – Prawns are highly perishable in their raw state and so are often frozen or boiled at sea as soon as they are caught. If cooking with Prawns, buy green (raw) Prawns, as cooked Prawns will toughen if reheated. Whether buying cooked or raw Prawns look for firmly attached heads and tight, firm shells with a good sheen. There shouldn’t be any blackening around the head or legs as this is a sign of oxidation, and they should have a pleasant “fresh sea” smell. Buy 1kg of Prawns in the shell to get about 500g of Prawn meat.

Redclaw – Sold mostly whole live, and occasionally cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Redclaw as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Rocklobsters – Rocklobsters are usually sold live, as frozen green tails, or cooked whole (frozen or chilled). If possible buy live, in which case they should be lively with a hard shell (indicating that they haven’t recently moulted) and all limbs and antennae should be intact. Avoid green (raw dead) Rocklobsters (except for frozen tails) as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead for and the flesh deteriorates very quickly. In cooked Rocklobsters, look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. They should feel heavy for their size and their tails should be tightly curled.

Yabby – Sold whole live or cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Yabbies as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Redclaw

Redclaw

Other Names

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Australian Lobster
Australian Redclaw Lobster
Clear-water Crayfish
Queensland Marron
Redclaw Lobster
Tropical Blue Crayfish

REDCLAW Substitutes

Crabs – Regardless of the type of Crab, look for ones which feel heavy for their size and have their legs and claws intact. With dead Crabs, if possible, give them a gentle shake to ensure there’s no sound of sloshing water. Live Crabs should be vigorous.

Marron – Sold whole live or cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Marron as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Prawns – Prawns are highly perishable in their raw state and so are often frozen or boiled at sea as soon as they are caught. If cooking with Prawns, buy green (raw) Prawns, as cooked Prawns will toughen if reheated. Whether buying cooked or raw Prawns look for firmly attached heads and tight, firm shells with a good sheen. There shouldn’t be any blackening around the head or legs as this is a sign of oxidation, and they should have a pleasant “fresh sea” smell. Buy 1kg of Prawns in the shell to get about 500g of Prawn meat.

Rocklobsters – Rocklobsters are usually sold live, as frozen green tails, or cooked whole (frozen or chilled). If possible buy live, in which case they should be lively with a hard shell (indicating that they haven’t recently moulted) and all limbs and antennae should be intact. Avoid green (raw dead) Rocklobsters (except for frozen tails) as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead for and the flesh deteriorates very quickly. In cooked Rocklobsters, look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. They should feel heavy for their size and their tails should be tightly curled.

Yabby – Sold whole live or cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Yabbies as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Yabby

yabby

Other Names

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Crawbob
Freshwater crayfish
Gilgie
Gilgy
Lobby
Yabbie

YABBY Substitutes

Crabs – Regardless of the type of Crab, look for ones which feel heavy for their size and have their legs and claws intact. With dead Crabs, if possible, give them a gentle shake to ensure there’s no sound of sloshing water. Live Crabs should be vigorous.

Marron – Sold whole live or cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Marron as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Prawns – Prawns are highly perishable in their raw state and so are often frozen or boiled at sea as soon as they are caught. If cooking with Prawns, buy green (raw) Prawns, as cooked Prawns will toughen if reheated. Whether buying cooked or raw Prawns look for firmly attached heads and tight, firm shells with a good sheen. There shouldn’t be any blackening around the head or legs as this is a sign of oxidation, and they should have a pleasant “fresh sea” smell. Buy 1kg of Prawns in the shell to get about 500g of Prawn meat.

Redclaw – Sold mostly whole live, and occasionally cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Redclaw as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Rocklobsters – Rocklobsters are usually sold live, as frozen green tails, or cooked whole (frozen or chilled). If possible buy live, in which case they should be lively with a hard shell (indicating that they haven’t recently moulted) and all limbs and antennae should be intact. Avoid green (raw dead) Rocklobsters (except for frozen tails) as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead for and the flesh deteriorates very quickly. In cooked Rocklobsters, look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. They should feel heavy for their size and their tails should be tightly curled.


See Glossary : xxxxxxxx


Australian Bass

Australian Bass

Other Names

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Australian Perch
Bass
Freshwater Perch

AUSTRALIAN BASS Substitutes

Blue-Eye Trevalla – Usually sold as fillets, cutlets or steaks. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for white to pale pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Lings – Ling are rarely seen whole, as they are quite unattractive fish coated in a thick layer of mucous. In fillet form however, they are quite popular due to their white, boneless flesh; they”re usually sold as skinless, boneless fillets. Look for pale white (with a pinkish ting in pink ling), firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Gemfish – Considered to be a very good eating fish with a delicate flavour and the thick white fillets are extremely tasty grilled, baked, smoked or fried. Gemfish are also known as Hake.

Mulloway – Well regarded eating fish with firm white flesh and few bones. Small fish are popular to roast or BBQ whole, but some can be soapy. Medium sized fish have a nice large flake and remain moist when grilled or fried. Larger fish can be dry and are better suited to soups, curries and other wet dishes.

King Threadfin – Sold mostly whole (gilled and gutted) or in skinned fillet or cutlet form, though sometimes seen as headless trunks or steaks. It often has large bony growths along the backbone, which make it difficult to fillet, so it is best cut into cutlets or steaks or bought already filleted. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for white-pale pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Barramundi

Barramundi

Other Names

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Asian Sea Perch
Asian Sea Bass
Barra
Giant Perch
Giant Sea Perch
Silver Barramundi

BARRAMUNDI Substitutes

Blue-Eye Trevalla – Usually sold as fillets, cutlets or steaks. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for white to pale pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Lings – Ling are rarely seen whole, as they are quite unattractive fish coated in a thick layer of mucous. In fillet form however, they are quite popular due to their white, boneless flesh; they”re usually sold as skinless, boneless fillets. Look for pale white (with a pinkish ting in pink ling), firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Gemfish – Considered to be a very good eating fish with a delicate flavour and the thick white fillets are extremely tasty grilled, baked, smoked or fried. Gemfish are also known as Hake.

Mulloway – Well regarded eating fish with firm white flesh and few bones. Small fish are popular to roast or BBQ whole, but some can be soapy. Medium sized fish have a nice large flake and remain moist when grilled or fried. Larger fish can be dry and are better suited to soups, curries and other wet dishes.

King Threadfin – Sold mostly whole (gilled and gutted) or in skinned fillet or cutlet form, though sometimes seen as headless trunks or steaks. It often has large bony growths along the backbone, which make it difficult to fillet, so it is best cut into cutlets or steaks or bought already filleted. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for white-pale pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Golden Perch

Golden Perch

Other Names

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Callop
Freshwater Bream
Golden
Murray Perch
Murray Bream
Tarki
White Perch
Yellowbelly
Yellow-Belly
Yellowfin Perch

GOLDEN PERCH Substitutes

Barramundi – Wild-caught barramundi is usually sold as fillets. In fillets, look for lustrous, firm, moist white-pinkish flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell. Farmed barramundi is mostly sold whole, look for firm flesh, which springs back when touched and a pleasant fresh smell.

Bream – Snapper is sold whole (gilled and gutted), in cutlet, steak and fillet forms. Other breams are generally sold whole (gilled and gutted), only occasionally as fillets, usually already skinned. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Flesh colour varies from the creamy pink of snapper to the pinker flesh of yellowfin bream, tarwhine, and pikey bream all of which may have some dark veins showing. Black bream”s flesh is slightly greyish and frypan bream”s has a yellowish tint.

Mirror Dory – Sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form (usually skin on). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pale pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Silver Perch – Sold whole (gilled and gutted) and fillet forms. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh smell. In fillets, look for creamy-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell.

Silver Trevally – Sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet forms. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pale reddish-brown, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Murray Cod

Murray Cod

Other Names

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Blue Cod
Blue Nose Cod
Bluenose
Cod
Codfish
Goodo
Greenfish and Murray Perch
Ponde
Rock Cod

MURRAY COD Substitutes

Leatherjackets – Leatherjackets are sold mainly as trunks (headed, gutted and skinned) and occasionally in fillet form (always skinned). In whole fish and trunks look for intact skin (if present), firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for white to off-white (or pinkish in reef leatherjackets), firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Pearl Perch – Suited to most cooking methods, particularly steaming or grilling. They have delicate and moist flesh, so the less handling during cooking the better. Remember to score thick fillets and tuck the tail end under the rest of the fillet for even heat distribution and cooking.

West Australian Dhufish – This species belongs to the Glaucosomatidae family (the pearl perches). It”s endemic to Western Australia, which means it doesn’t occur anywhere else. Suited to most cooking methods, particularly steaming or grilling. They have delicate and moist flesh, so the less handling during cooking the better. Remember to score thick fillets and tuck the tail end under the rest of the fillet for even heat distribution and cooking.

Silver Perch

Silver Perch

Other Names

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Bidyan
Black Bream
Black Perch
Bream
Freshwater Bream
Grunter
Murray Perch
Silver
Tcheri

SILVER PERCH Substitutes

Barramundi – Wild-caught barramundi is usually sold as fillets. In fillets, look for lustrous, firm, moist white-pinkish flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell. Farmed barramundi is mostly sold whole, look for firm flesh, which springs back when touched and a pleasant fresh smell.

Bream – Snapper is sold whole (gilled and gutted), in cutlet, steak and fillet forms. Other breams are generally sold whole (gilled and gutted), only occasionally as fillets, usually already skinned. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Flesh colour varies from the creamy pink of snapper to the pinker flesh of yellowfin bream, tarwhine, and pikey bream all of which may have some dark veins showing. Black bream”s flesh is slightly greyish and frypan bream”s has a yellowish tint.

Golden Perch – Sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh smell. In fillets, look for yellowish-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell.

Silver Trevally – Sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet forms. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pale reddish-brown, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.


See Glossary : xxxxxxxx


Ocean Jacket

Ocean Jacket

Other Names

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Chinaman
Chinaman Leatherjacket
Leather-Jacket
Yellow Jacket

OCEAN JACKET Substitutes

Dories – Dories are sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form (usually skin on, as the most highly prized, John dory, is identified by the dark spot on its side). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. John dory flesh is white, whereas mirror dory has a pink tinge and silver and king dories are slightly yellowish.

Gemfish – Considered to be a very good eating fish with a delicate flavour and the thick white fillets are extremely tasty grilled, baked, smoked or fried. Gemfish are also known as Hake.

Morwong – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet form (often skinned). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for creamy pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Rockcods – Rockcods are sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for white-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Species living in estuaries, such as goldspotted rockcod, will often have darker flesh.
See Glossary : xxxxxxxx


Pink Ling

Pink Ling

Other Names

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  • Kingclip
  • Ling
PINK LING Substitutes

Angel Shark

Barramundi

Blue-eye Trevalla

Coral Trout

Gemfish.

Rock Ling

Rock Ling

Other Names

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  • Beardy
  • Kingclip
  • Ling
ROCK LING Substitutes

Angel Shark, Barramundi, Blue-eye Trevalla, Coral Trout, Gemfish.
See Glossary : xxxxxxxx


Blue Mackerel

Blue Mackerel

Other Names

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Pacific Mackerel
Slimy Mackerel
BLUE MACKEREL Substitutes

Other Mackerels – Blue Mackerel are often sold whole or as fillets, and the larger Mackerels are usually seen as cutlets or steaks. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets look for bright flesh that’s dark red in Blue Mackerel, and pinky-white in the larger Mackerels, with Spanish Mackerel virtually white. It should be firm, lustrous and moist without any dark brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Jack Mackerel (not a true Mackerel, but a Trevally) – Sold whole (gilled and gutted); look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell.

Bonito – Usually sold whole, though fishmongers will fillet it upon request; also sometimes available as sashimi. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell; flesh should be pale reddish (pale pink to white in Leaping Bonito), firm, lustrous and moist without any dull brown markings or oozing water. Always buy sashimi-grade fish if it is to be served raw or rare.

Striped Marlin – Usually sold as steaks. Look for reddish-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Swordfish – Usually sold as steaks, but also sometimes as cutlets or sashimi. Look for cream-pale pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Trevallies – Larger fish are sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet form, with yellowtail kingfish also sold as steaks and cutlets; smaller fish, such as yellowtail scad, are usually only seen whole. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for pinky-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Tunas – Tuna is usually sold as steaks, cutlets or sliced as sashimi. Look for pinkish red to burgundy flesh (colour varies with species and cut) that is firm, lustrous and moist without any dull brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Always buy sashimi-grade fish if it is to be served raw or rare.

Yellowtail Scad – Sold whole; look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell.

Grey Mackerel

Grey Mackerel

Other Names

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Broad-Barred Mackerel
Spanish Mackerel
Tiger Mackerel

GREY MACKEREL Substitutes

Other Mackerels – Blue Mackerel are often sold whole or as fillets, and the larger Mackerels are usually seen as cutlets or steaks. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets look for bright flesh that’s dark red in Blue Mackerel, and pinky-white in the larger Mackerels, with Spanish Mackerel virtually white. It should be firm, lustrous and moist without any dark brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Bonito – Usually sold whole, though fishmongers will fillet it upon request; also sometimes available as sashimi. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell; flesh should be pale reddish (pale pink to white in Leaping Bonito), firm, lustrous and moist without any dull brown markings or oozing water. Always buy sashimi-grade fish if it is to be served raw or rare.

Striped Marlin – Usually sold as steaks. Look for reddish-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Swordfish – Usually sold as steaks, but also sometimes as cutlets or sashimi. Look for cream-pale pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Tunas – Tuna is usually sold as steaks, cutlets or sliced as sashimi. Look for pinkish red to burgundy flesh (colour varies with species and cut) that is firm, lustrous and moist without any dull brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Always buy sashimi-grade fish if it is to be served raw or rare.

School Mackerel

School Mackerel

Other Names

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Doggie Mackerel
Queensland School Mackerel

SCHOOL MACKEREL Substitutes

Other Mackerels – Blue Mackerel are often sold whole or as fillets, and the larger Mackerels are usually seen as cutlets or steaks. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets look for bright flesh that’s dark red in Blue Mackerel, and pinky-white in the larger Mackerels, with Spanish Mackerel virtually white. It should be firm, lustrous and moist without any dark brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Bonito – Usually sold whole, though fishmongers will fillet it upon request; also sometimes available as sashimi. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell; flesh should be pale reddish (pale pink to white in Leaping Bonito), firm, lustrous and moist without any dull brown markings or oozing water. Always buy sashimi-grade fish if it is to be served raw or rare.

Striped Marlin – Usually sold as steaks. Look for reddish-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Swordfish – Usually sold as steaks, but also sometimes as cutlets or sashimi. Look for cream-pale pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Tunas – Tuna is usually sold as steaks, cutlets or sliced as sashimi. Look for pinkish red to burgundy flesh (colour varies with species and cut) that is firm, lustrous and moist without any dull brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Always buy sashimi-grade fish if it is to be served raw or rare.

Spanish Mackerel

Spanish Mackerel

Other Names

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Mackerel
Macko
Narrow-Bar
Narrow-Barred Spanish Mackerel
Snook
Spaniard

SPANISH MACKEREL Substitutes

Other Mackerels – Blue Mackerel are often sold whole or as fillets, and the larger Mackerels are usually seen as cutlets or steaks. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets look for bright flesh that’s dark red in Blue Mackerel, and pinky-white in the larger Mackerels, with Spanish Mackerel virtually white. It should be firm, lustrous and moist without any dark brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Bonito – Usually sold whole, though fishmongers will fillet it upon request; also sometimes available as sashimi. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell; flesh should be pale reddish (pale pink to white in Leaping Bonito), firm, lustrous and moist without any dull brown markings or oozing water. Always buy sashimi-grade fish if it is to be served raw or rare.

Striped Marlin – Usually sold as steaks. Look for reddish-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Swordfish – Usually sold as steaks, but also sometimes as cutlets or sashimi. Look for cream-pale pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Tunas – Tuna is usually sold as steaks, cutlets or sliced as sashimi. Look for pinkish red to burgundy flesh (colour varies with species and cut) that is firm, lustrous and moist without any dull brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Always buy sashimi-grade fish if it is to be served raw or rare.

Spotted Mackerel

Spotted Mackerel

Other Names

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Spotty

SPOTTED MACKEREL Substitutes

Other Mackerels – Blue Mackerel are often sold whole or as fillets, and the larger Mackerels are usually seen as cutlets or steaks. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets look for bright flesh that’s dark red in Blue Mackerel, and pinky-white in the larger Mackerels, with Spanish Mackerel virtually white. It should be firm, lustrous and moist without any dark brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Bonito – Usually sold whole, though fishmongers will fillet it upon request; also sometimes available as sashimi. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell; flesh should be pale reddish (pale pink to white in Leaping Bonito), firm, lustrous and moist without any dull brown markings or oozing water. Always buy sashimi-grade fish if it is to be served raw or rare.

Striped Marlin – Usually sold as steaks. Look for reddish-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Swordfish – Usually sold as steaks, but also sometimes as cutlets or sashimi. Look for cream-pale pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Tunas – Tuna is usually sold as steaks, cutlets or sliced as sashimi. Look for pinkish red to burgundy flesh (colour varies with species and cut) that is firm, lustrous and moist without any dull brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Always buy sashimi-grade fish if it is to be served raw or rare.

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Diamondscale Mullet

Diamondscale mullet

Diamondscale mullet

Other Names

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Diamondscaled Mullet
Largescale Mullet
DIAMONDSCALE MULLET Substitutes

Other Mullets – Mullets are usually sold as skinless fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pinkish-grey, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Australian Salmon – Sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pale pink to brown, firm, lustrous flesh without any discolouration or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Eel – Becoming increasingly available live and chilled. They are most commonly used smoked and in casseroles, pâtés or soups, but are also delicious grilled or barbecued.

Pilchard – Sold whole and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for reddish-brown, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Shark Mackerel – Sold mainly as cutlets and steaks. In cutlets and steaks look for bright off-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any dark brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Tailor – A well-known Australian finfish with a rich, strong flavour. Its high oil content makes it ideal for grilling, barbecuing or baking but it can also be fried. The flesh is soft so minimal handling and careful cooking are required.

Trevally – Larger fish are sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet form, with yellowtail kingfish also sold as steaks and cutlets; smaller fish, such as yellowtail scad, are usually only seen whole. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for pinky-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Sea Mullet

Sea Mullet

Sea Mullet

Other Names

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Bully Mullet
Hardgut Mullet
Hardgut River Mullet
Mangrove Mullet
Poddy Mullet
River Mullet

SEA MULLET Substitutes

Other Mullets – Mullets are usually sold as skinless fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pinkish-grey, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Australian Salmon – Sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pale pink to brown, firm, lustrous flesh without any discolouration or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Eel – Becoming increasingly available live and chilled. They are most commonly used smoked and in casseroles, pâtés or soups, but are also delicious grilled or barbecued.

Pilchard – Sold whole and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for reddish-brown, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Shark Mackerel – Sold mainly as cutlets and steaks. In cutlets and steaks look for bright off-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any dark brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Tailor – A well-known Australian finfish with a rich, strong flavour. Its high oil content makes it ideal for grilling, barbecuing or baking but it can also be fried. The flesh is soft so minimal handling and careful cooking are required.

Trevally – Larger fish are sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet form, with yellowtail kingfish also sold as steaks and cutlets; smaller fish, such as yellowtail scad, are usually only seen whole. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for pinky-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.
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Blue Mussel

Blue Mussel

Other Names

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Black Mussel
Common Mussel
Mussel

BLUE MUSSEL Substitutes

Pipis – Sold live. Look for brightly coloured, intact, lustrous shells, that are closed or close when tapped or gently squeezed, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Due to their sandy habitat they can contain quite a bit of grit, ask your fishmonger if they have been purged (stored in aerated saltwater for at least 24 hours to eliminate sand), if they haven’t been, see purging instructions.

Surf Clams – Sold live. Look for brightly coloured, intact, lustrous shells, that are closed or close when tapped or gently squeezed, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Due to their sandy habitat they can contain a bit of grit, ask your fishmonger if they have been purged (stored in aerated saltwater for at least 24 hours to eliminate sand), if they haven’t been, see purging instructions.

Vongole – Sold live. Look for brightly coloured, intact, lustrous shells, that are closed or close when tapped or gently squeezed, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Due to their sandy habitat they can contain a bit of grit, ask your fishmonger if they have been purged (stored in aerated saltwater for at least 24 hours to eliminate sand), if they haven’t been, see purging instructions.
See Glossary : xxxxxxxx


Native Oyster

Native Oyster

Other Names

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Angasi, Belon, .
Flat Oyster, Mud Oyster
Port Lincoln Oyster

NATIVE OYSTER Substitutes

Blue Mussels can be substituted in some recipes.

Pacific Oyster

Pacific Oyster

Other Names

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Coffin Bay Oyster
Japanese Oyster
Tasmanian Oyster

PACIFIC OYSTER Substitutes

Other Oysters – Oysters are best bought live and shucked just before serving. Store them unopened in the warmest part of the fridge (usually the crisper) for up to a week, covered with a cloth that is kept damp.

Blue Mussels can be substituted in some recipes.

Sydney Rock Oyster

Sydney rock oyster - Saccostrea glomerata

Other Names

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Commercial Oyster
Rock Oyster
Sydney Oyster
Western Rock Oyster (If from WA)

SYDNEY ROCK OYSTER Substitutes

Other Oysters

Blue Mussels can be substituted in some recipes.
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Banana Prawn

Banana Prawn

Other Names

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Indian Banana Prawn (Redleg)
Gulf Banana Prawn
White Prawn (White)

BANANA PRAWN Substitutes

Other Prawns – Prawns are highly perishable in their raw state and so are often frozen or boiled at sea as soon as they are caught. If cooking with Prawns, buy green (raw) Prawns, as cooked Prawns will toughen if reheated. Whether buying cooked or raw Prawns look for firmly attached heads and tight, firm shells with a good sheen. There shouldn’t be any blackening around the head or legs as this is a sign of oxidation, and they should have a pleasant fresh sea smell. Buy 1kg of Prawns in the shell to get about 500g of Prawn meat.

Bugs – Bugs are usually sold whole, sometimes live but often already cooked. If possible buy live from a tank, in which case they should be lively with a hard shell (indicating that they haven’t recently moulted) and all legs and antennae should be intact. Unlike Crabs and Rocklobsters, Bugs don’t survive well out of water; if buying chilled green (raw dead) Bugs, ask when they were alive, they should only be stored chilled for about 48 hours before being cooked. In cooked Bugs, look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. They should feel heavy for their size and their tails should be tightly curled.

Marron – Sold whole live or cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Marron as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Redclaw – Sold mostly whole live, and occasionally cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Redclaw as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Rocklobsters – Rocklobsters are usually sold live, as frozen green tails, or cooked whole (frozen or chilled). If possible buy live, in which case they should be lively with a hard shell (indicating that they haven’t recently moulted) and all limbs and antennae should be intact. Avoid green (raw dead) Rocklobsters (except for frozen tails) as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead for and the flesh deteriorates very quickly. In cooked Rocklobsters, look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. They should feel heavy for their size and their tails should be tightly curled.

Yabby – Sold whole live or cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Yabbies as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Bay Prawn

Other Names

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Emerald Shrimp
Greasyback Bay Prawn
Greentail Shrimp
Inshore Greasyback Prawn
Greasyback Prawn

BAY PRAWN Substitutes

Other Prawns – Prawns are highly perishable in their raw state and so are often frozen or boiled at sea as soon as they are caught. If cooking with Prawns, buy green (raw) Prawns, as cooked Prawns will toughen if reheated. Whether buying cooked or raw Prawns look for firmly attached heads and tight, firm shells with a good sheen. There shouldn’t be any blackening around the head or legs as this is a sign of oxidation, and they should have a pleasant fresh sea smell. Buy 1kg of prawns in the shell to get about 500g of prawn meat.

Bugs – Bugs are usually sold whole, sometimes live but often already cooked. If possible buy live from a tank, in which case they should be lively with a hard shell (indicating that they haven’t recently moulted) and all legs and antennae should be intact. Unlike crabs and rocklobsters, bugs don’t survive well out of water; if buying chilled green (raw dead) Bugs, ask when they were alive, they should only be stored chilled for about 48 hours before being cooked. In cooked Bugs, look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. They should feel heavy for their size and their tails should be tightly curled.

Marron – Sold whole live or cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Marron as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Redclaw – Sold mostly whole live, and occasionally cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Redclaw as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Rocklobsters – Rocklobsters are usually sold live, as frozen green tails, or cooked whole (frozen or chilled). If possible buy live, in which case they should be lively with a hard shell (indicating that they haven’t recently moulted) and all limbs and antennae should be intact. Avoid green (raw dead) Rocklobsters (except for frozen tails) as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead for and the flesh deteriorates very quickly. In cooked Rocklobsters, look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. They should feel heavy for their size and their tails should be tightly curled.

Yabby – Sold whole live or cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Yabbies as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Endeavour Prawn

Endeavour Prawn

Other Names

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Bluetail Endeavour
Endeavour Shrimp (Blue)
Greasyback Shrimp
Greasyback Prawn
Offshore Greasyback Prawn (Red)

ENDEAVOUR PRAWN Substitutes

Other Prawns – Prawns are highly perishable in their raw state and so are often frozen or boiled at sea as soon as they are caught. If cooking with prawns, buy green (raw) Prawns, as cooked prawns will toughen if reheated. Whether buying cooked or raw Prawns look for firmly attached heads and tight, firm shells with a good sheen. There shouldn’t be any blackening around the head or legs as this is a sign of oxidation, and they should have a pleasant fresh sea smell. Buy 1kg of Prawns in the shell to get about 500g of Prawn meat.

Bugs – Bugs are usually sold whole, sometimes live but often already cooked. If possible buy live from a tank, in which case they should be lively with a hard shell (indicating that they haven’t recently moulted) and all legs and antennae should be intact. Unlike crabs and rocklobsters, bugs don’t survive well out of water; if buying chilled green (raw dead) Bugs, ask when they were alive, they should only be stored chilled for about 48 hours before being cooked. In cooked Bugs, look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. They should feel heavy for their size and their tails should be tightly curled.

Marron – Sold whole live or cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Marron as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Redclaw – Sold mostly whole live, and occasionally cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Redclaw as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Rocklobsters – Rocklobsters are usually sold live, as frozen green tails, or cooked whole (frozen or chilled). If possible buy live, in which case they should be lively with a hard shell (indicating that they haven’t recently moulted) and all limbs and antennae should be intact. Avoid green (raw dead) Rocklobsters (except for frozen tails) as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead for and the flesh deteriorates very quickly. In cooked Rocklobsters, look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. They should feel heavy for their size and their tails should be tightly curled.

Yabby – Sold whole live or cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Yabbies as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

King Prawn

King Prawn

Other Names

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Blueleg Prawn
Eastern Prawn
Ocean King Prawn
Sand Prawn (Eastern)
Western Prawn (Western)
Red Spotted Prawn (Redspot)

KING PRAWN Substitutes

Other Prawns – Prawns are highly perishable in their raw state and so are often frozen or boiled at sea as soon as they are caught. If cooking with prawns, buy green (raw) Prawns, as cooked prawns will toughen if reheated. Whether buying cooked or raw prawns look for firmly attached heads and tight, firm shells with a good sheen. There shouldn’t be any blackening around the head or legs as this is a sign of oxidation, and they should have a pleasant fresh sea smell. Buy 1kg of Prawns in the shell to get about 500g of Prawn meat.

Bugs – Bugs are usually sold whole, sometimes live but often already cooked. If possible buy live from a tank, in which case they should be lively with a hard shell (indicating that they haven’t recently moulted) and all legs and antennae should be intact. Unlike crabs and rocklobsters, bugs don’t survive well out of water; if buying chilled green (raw dead) Bugs, ask when they were alive, they should only be stored chilled for about 48 hours before being cooked. In cooked Bugs, look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. They should feel heavy for their size and their tails should be tightly curled.

Marron – Sold whole live or cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled marron as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Redclaw – Sold mostly whole live, and occasionally cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled redclaw as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Rocklobsters – Rocklobsters are usually sold live, as frozen green tails, or cooked whole (frozen or chilled). If possible buy live, in which case they should be lively with a hard shell (indicating that they haven’t recently moulted) and all limbs and antennae should be intact. Avoid green (raw dead) Rocklobsters (except for frozen tails) as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead for and the flesh deteriorates very quickly. In cooked Rocklobsters, look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. They should feel heavy for their size and their tails should be tightly curled.

Yabby – Sold whole live or cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Yabbies as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Royal Red Prawn

Royal Red Prawn

Other Names

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Jack-Knife Shrimp
Pink Prawn
Redspot King Prawn

ROYAL RED PRAWN Substitutes

Other Prawns – Prawns are highly perishable in their raw state and so are often frozen or boiled at sea as soon as they are caught. If cooking with Prawns, buy green (raw) Prawns, as cooked Prawns will toughen if reheated. Whether buying cooked or raw Prawns look for firmly attached heads and tight, firm shells with a good sheen. There shouldn’t be any blackening around the head or legs as this is a sign of oxidation, and they should have a pleasant fresh sea smell. Buy 1kg of Prawns in the shell to get about 500g of Prawn meat.

Bugs – Bugs are usually sold whole, sometimes live but often already cooked. If possible buy live from a tank, in which case they should be lively with a hard shell (indicating that they haven’t recently moulted) and all legs and antennae should be intact. Unlike Crabs and Rocklobsters, Bugs don’t survive well out of water; if buying chilled green (raw dead) Bugs, ask when they were alive, they should only be stored chilled for about 48 hours before being cooked. In cooked Bugs, look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. They should feel heavy for their size and their tails should be tightly curled.

Marron – Sold whole live or cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Marron as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Redclaw – Sold mostly whole live, and occasionally cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Redclaw as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Rocklobsters – Rocklobsters are usually sold live, as frozen green tails, or cooked whole (frozen or chilled). If possible buy live, in which case they should be lively with a hard shell (indicating that they haven’t recently moulted) and all limbs and antennae should be intact. Avoid green (raw dead) Rocklobsters (except for frozen tails) as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead for and the flesh deteriorates very quickly. In cooked Rocklobsters, look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. They should feel heavy for their size and their tails should be tightly curled.

Yabby – Sold whole live or cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Yabbies as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

School Prawn

School Prawn

Other Names

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NSW School Prawn
Stockton Bight Prawn
York Prawn
White River Prawn
Bay Prawn
Schoolie (School)
River Prawn (Western School)

SCHOOL PRAWN Substitutes

Other Prawns – Prawns are highly perishable in their raw state and so are often frozen or boiled at sea as soon as they are caught. If cooking with Prawns, buy green (raw) Prawns, as cooked Prawns will toughen if reheated. Whether buying cooked or raw Prawns look for firmly attached heads and tight, firm shells with a good sheen. There shouldn’t be any blackening around the head or legs as this is a sign of oxidation, and they should have a pleasant fresh sea smell. Buy 1kg of Prawns in the shell to get about 500g of Prawn meat.

Bugs – Bugs are usually sold whole, sometimes live but often already cooked. If possible buy live from a tank, in which case they should be lively with a hard shell (indicating that they haven’t recently moulted) and all legs and antennae should be intact. Unlike Crabs and Rocklobsters, Bugs don’t survive well out of water; if buying chilled green (raw dead) Bugs, ask when they were alive, they should only be stored chilled for about 48 hours before being cooked. In cooked Bugs, look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. They should feel heavy for their size and their tails should be tightly curled.

Marron – Sold whole live or cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Marron as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Redclaw – Sold mostly whole live, and occasionally cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Redclaw as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Rocklobsters – Rocklobsters are usually sold live, as frozen green tails, or cooked whole (frozen or chilled). If possible buy live, in which case they should be lively with a hard shell (indicating that they haven’t recently moulted) and all limbs and antennae should be intact. Avoid green (raw dead) Rocklobsters (except for frozen tails) as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead for and the flesh deteriorates very quickly. In cooked Rocklobsters, look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. They should feel heavy for their size and their tails should be tightly curled.

Yabby – Sold whole live or cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Yabbies as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.


Tiger Prawn

Tiger Prawns

Other Names

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Blue Tiger Prawn
Giant Tiger Prawn
Jumbo Tiger Prawn
Leader Prawn
Panda Prawn
Tropical Prawn (Black)
Common Tiger Prawn
Green Tiger Prawn
Northern Tiger Prawn (Brown)
Green Tiger Prawn
Northern Tiger Prawn (Grooved)
Japanese King Prawn (Kuruma)

TIGER PRAWN Substitutes

Other Prawns – Prawns are highly perishable in their raw state and so are often frozen or boiled at sea as soon as they are caught. If cooking with Prawns, buy green (raw) Prawns, as cooked Prawns will toughen if reheated. Whether buying cooked or raw Prawns look for firmly attached heads and tight, firm shells with a good sheen. There shouldn’t be any blackening around the head or legs as this is a sign of oxidation, and they should have a pleasant fresh sea smell. Buy 1kg of Prawns in the shell to get about 500g of Prawn meat.

Bugs – Bugs are usually sold whole, sometimes live but often already cooked. If possible buy live from a tank, in which case they should be lively with a hard shell (indicating that they haven’t recently moulted) and all legs and antennae should be intact. Unlike crabs and rocklobsters, bugs don’t survive well out of water; if buying chilled green (raw dead) Bugs, ask when they were alive, they should only be stored chilled for about 48 hours before being cooked. In cooked Bugs, look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. They should feel heavy for their size and their tails should be tightly curled.

Marron – Sold whole live or cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Marron as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Redclaw – Sold mostly whole live, and occasionally cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Redclaw as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.

Rocklobsters – Rocklobsters are usually sold live, as frozen green tails, or cooked whole (frozen or chilled). If possible buy live, in which case they should be lively with a hard shell (indicating that they haven’t recently moulted) and all limbs and antennae should be intact. Avoid green (raw dead) Rocklobsters (except for frozen tails) as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead for and the flesh deteriorates very quickly. In cooked Rocklobsters, look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. They should feel heavy for their size and their tails should be tightly curled.

Yabby – Sold whole live or cooked and chilled or frozen. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. If possible buy live, avoid green (raw dead) chilled Yabbies as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead.
See Glossary : xxxxxxxx


Eastern Shovelnose Ray

Eastern Shovelnose Ray

Other Names

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Fiddler Shark
Guitarfish

EASTERN SHOVELNOSE RAY Substitutes

Other Guitarfish – The tail meat of Guitarfish is generally pale pink with dark red muscle bands and is always sold skinned; they’re commonly sold around 1-2kg though they can grow much larger.

Lings – Ling are rarely seen whole, as they are quite unattractive fish coated in a thick layer of mucous. In fillet form however, they are quite popular due to their white, boneless flesh; they’re usually sold as skinless, boneless fillets. Look for pale white (with a pinkish ting in pink ling), firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Rays – Caught mainly as by-catch, these fish represent very good value. There’s little, if any, differentiation between species in the market; it’s generally the pectoral fins of Rays and Skate that are eaten and the names ‘flaps’ and ‘wings’ tend to be used interchangeably for Ray and Skate fins. Smaller fish are more tender than larger ones, and it is normal for the flesh to gape a little in long strands.

Sharks

Skates – Caught mainly as by-catch, these fish represent very good value. There’s little, if any, differentiation between species in the market; it’s generally the pectoral fins of Rays and Skate that are eaten and the names ‘flaps’ and ‘wings’ tend to be used interchangeably for Ray and Skate fins. Smaller fish are more tender than larger ones, and it is normal for the flesh to gape a little in long strands.
See Glossary : xxxxxxxx


Bar Rockcod

Bar Cod

Other Names

Bar Cod
Barcod
Cod
Grey-Banded Cod
Grey-Banded Rockcod
Grey-Banded Rock-Cod
Maori Cod
Redflush Rockcod
Redmouth Rockcod
Rock-Cod
Sea-Bass
Six Banded Rock Cod

 

BAR ROCKCOD Substitutes

Other Rockcods – Rockcods are sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for white-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Species living in estuaries, such as goldspotted rockcod, will often have darker flesh.

Bass Groper –

Hapuku –

Leatherjackets – Leatherjackets are sold mainly as trunks (headed, gutted and skinned) and occasionally in fillet form (always skinned). In whole fish and trunks look for intact skin (if present), firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for white to off-white (or pinkish in reef leatherjackets), firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Murray Cod – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), but usually as skinless fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh smell. In fillets, look for white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell.

Pearl Perch – The east coast relative of the much acclaimed West Australian dhufish. Caught between Rockhampton and Sydney, it has thick, moist, flesh with a sweet, delicate flavour and is an excellent fish for steaming.

Red Emperor – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), as trunks (headless) and fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for yellowish-white to pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

West Australian Dhufish – West Australian dhufish and pearl perches are grouped together as they belong to the same genus (Glaucosoma) and produce similarly highly esteemed products. These species have excellent taste and yield thick, white flesh. Sold mainly as fillets, they are highly sought after.


Coral Trout

Coral Trout

Other Names

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Bar-Cheeked Trout
Barred-Cheek Coral Trout
Blue-Spot Trout
Chinese Footballer
Coral Cod
Coral-Trout
Coronation Trout
Fairy Cod
Footballer Cod
Highfin Coral Trout
Leopard Cod
Leopard Trout
Lined Coral Trout
Lunar Tailed Rock Cod
Lunartail Rockcod
Lunar-Tailed Cod
Lyretail Trout
Squaretail Coral Trout
Trout
Vermicular Cod
Vermicular Leopard-Cod
Vermicular Trout
White-Fringed Moontail-Bass

CORAL TROUT Substitutes

Other Rockcods – Rockcods are sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for white-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Species living in estuaries, such as goldspotted rockcod, will often have darker flesh.

Bass Groper

Hapuku

Leatherjackets – Leatherjackets are sold mainly as trunks (headed, gutted and skinned) and occasionally in fillet form (always skinned). In whole fish and trunks look for intact skin (if present), firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for white to off-white (or pinkish in reef leatherjackets), firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Murray Cod – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), but usually as skinless fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh smell. In fillets, look for white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell.

Pearl Perch – The east coast relative of the much acclaimed West Australian dhufish. Caught between Rockhampton and Sydney, it has thick, moist, flesh with a sweet, delicate flavour and is an excellent fish for steaming.

Red Emperor – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), as trunks (headless) and fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for yellowish-white to pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

West Australian Dhufish – West Australian dhufish and pearl perches are grouped together as they belong to the same genus (Glaucosoma) and produce similarly highly esteemed products. These species have excellent taste and yield thick, white flesh. Sold mainly as fillets, they are highly sought after.


Eastern Wirrah

Eastern Wirrah

Other Names

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Boot
Meat Wirrah
Mother-In-Law Fish
Old Boot
Peppermint Cod
Wirrah
Wirrah Cod

EASTERN WIRRAH Substitutes

Other Rockcods – Rockcods are sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for white-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Species living in estuaries, such as goldspotted rockcod, will often have darker flesh.

Bass Groper

Hapuku

Leatherjackets – Leatherjackets are sold mainly as trunks (headed, gutted and skinned) and occasionally in fillet form (always skinned). In whole fish and trunks look for intact skin (if present), firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for white to off-white (or pinkish in reef leatherjackets), firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Murray Cod – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), but usually as skinless fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh smell. In fillets, look for white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell.

Pearl Perch – The east coast relative of the much acclaimed West Australian dhufish. Caught between Rockhampton and Sydney, it has thick, moist, flesh with a sweet, delicate flavour and is an excellent fish for steaming.

Red Emperor – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), as trunks (headless) and fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for yellowish-white to pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

West Australian Dhufish – West Australian dhufish and pearl perches are grouped together as they belong to the same genus (Glaucosoma) and produce similarly highly esteemed products. These species have excellent taste and yield thick, white flesh. Sold mainly as fillets, they are highly sought after.


Goldspotted Rockcod

Goldspotted Rockcod

Other Names

Estuary Cod
Estuary Rockcod
Orange-Spotted Cod

Goldspotted Rockcod Substitutes

Other Rockcods – Rockcods are sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for white-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Species living in estuaries, such as goldspotted rockcod, will often have darker flesh.

Bass Groper

Hapuku

Leatherjackets – Leatherjackets are sold mainly as trunks (headed, gutted and skinned) and occasionally in fillet form (always skinned). In whole fish and trunks look for intact skin (if present), firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for white to off-white (or pinkish in reef leatherjackets), firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Murray Cod – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), but usually as skinless fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh smell. In fillets, look for white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell.

Pearl Perch – The east coast relative of the much acclaimed West Australian dhufish. Caught between Rockhampton and Sydney, it has thick, moist, flesh with a sweet, delicate flavour and is an excellent fish for steaming.

Red Emperor – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), as trunks (headless) and fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for yellowish-white to pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

West Australian Dhufish – West Australian dhufish and pearl perches are grouped together as they belong to the same genus (Glaucosoma) and produce similarly highly esteemed products. These species have excellent taste and yield thick, white flesh. Sold mainly as fillets, they are highly sought after.


Longfin Perch

Longfin Perch

Other Names

Longfin Orange Perch
Pink Maomao

Longfin Perch Substitutes

Other Rockcods – Rockcods are sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for white-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Species living in estuaries, such as goldspotted rockcod, will often have darker flesh.

Bass Groper

Hapuku

Leatherjackets – Leatherjackets are sold mainly as trunks (headed, gutted and skinned) and occasionally in fillet form (always skinned). In whole fish and trunks look for intact skin (if present), firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for white to off-white (or pinkish in reef leatherjackets), firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Murray Cod – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), but usually as skinless fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh smell. In fillets, look for white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell.

Pearl Perch – The east coast relative of the much acclaimed West Australian dhufish. Caught between Rockhampton and Sydney, it has thick, moist, flesh with a sweet, delicate flavour and is an excellent fish for steaming.

Red Emperor – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), as trunks (headless) and fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for yellowish-white to pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

West Australian Dhufish – West Australian dhufish and pearl perches are grouped together as they belong to the same genus (Glaucosoma) and produce similarly highly esteemed products. These species have excellent taste and yield thick, white flesh. Sold mainly as fillets, they are highly sought after.


Yellowspotted Rockcod

Yellowspotted Rockcod

Other Names

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Yellow-Spotted Cod
Areolate Cod
Aredate Cod
Green-Spotted Rockcod

YELLOWSPOTTED ROCKCOD Substitutes

Other Rockcods – Rockcods are sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for white-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Species living in estuaries, such as goldspotted rockcod, will often have darker flesh.

Bass Groper

Hapuku

Leatherjackets – Leatherjackets are sold mainly as trunks (headed, gutted and skinned) and occasionally in fillet form (always skinned). In whole fish and trunks look for intact skin (if present), firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for white to off-white (or pinkish in reef leatherjackets), firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Murray Cod – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), but usually as skinless fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh smell. In fillets, look for white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell.

Pearl Perch – The east coast relative of the much acclaimed West Australian dhufish. Caught between Rockhampton and Sydney, it has thick, moist, flesh with a sweet, delicate flavour and is an excellent fish for steaming.

Red Emperor – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), as trunks (headless) and fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for yellowish-white to pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

West Australian Dhufish – West Australian dhufish and pearl perches are grouped together as they belong to the same genus (Glaucosoma) and produce similarly highly esteemed products. These species have excellent taste and yield thick, white flesh. Sold mainly as fillets, they are highly sought after.
See Glossary : xxxxxxxx


Eastern Rocklobster

Eastern Rocklobster

Other Names

Crayfish
Green Rocklobster
Local Lobster
Packhorse Crayfish
Sydney Crayfish

Eastern Rocklobster Substitutes

Crabs – Regardless of the type of crab, look for ones which feel heavy for their size and have their legs and claws intact. With dead crabs, if possible, give them a gentle shake to ensure there’s no sound of sloshing water. Live crabs should be vigorous.

Bugs – Bugs are usually sold whole, sometimes live but often already cooked. If possible buy live from a tank, in which case they should be lively with a hard shell (indicating that they haven’t recently moulted) and all legs and antennae should be intact. Unlike crabs and rocklobsters, bugs don’t survive well out of water; if buying chilled green (raw dead) bugs, ask when they were alive, they should only be stored chilled for about 48 hours before being cooked. In cooked bugs, look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. They should feel heavy for their size and their tails should be tightly curled.

Prawns – Prawns are highly perishable in their raw state and so are often frozen or boiled at sea as soon as they are caught. If cooking with prawns, buy green (raw) prawns, as cooked prawns will toughen if reheated. Whether buying cooked or raw prawns look for firmly attached heads and tight, firm shells with a good sheen. There shouldn’t be any blackening around the head or legs as this is a sign of oxidation, and they should have a pleasant fresh sea smell. Buy 1kg of prawns in the shell to get about 500g of prawn meat.

Other Rocklobsters – Rocklobsters are usually sold live, as frozen green tails, or cooked whole (frozen or chilled). If possible buy live, in which case they should be lively with a hard shell (indicating that they haven’t recently moulted) and all limbs and antennae should be intact. Avoid green (raw dead) rocklobsters (except for frozen tails) as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead for and the flesh deteriorates very quickly. In cooked rocklobsters, look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. They should feel heavy for their size and their tails should be tightly curled.


Southern Rocklobster

Southern Rocklobster

Other Names

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Cray
Crayfish
Melbourne Crayfish
Red Rocklobster
Southern Lobster
Southern Spiny Lobster
Tasmanian Crayfish

SOUTHERN ROCKLOBSTER Substitutes

Crabs – Regardless of the type of crab, look for ones which feel heavy for their size and have their legs and claws intact. With dead crabs, if possible, give them a gentle shake to ensure there’s no sound of sloshing water. Live crabs should be vigorous.

Bugs – Bugs are usually sold whole, sometimes live but often already cooked. If possible buy live from a tank, in which case they should be lively with a hard shell (indicating that they haven’t recently moulted) and all legs and antennae should be intact. Unlike crabs and rocklobsters, bugs don’t survive well out of water; if buying chilled green (raw dead) bugs, ask when they were alive, they should only be stored chilled for about 48 hours before being cooked. In cooked bugs, look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. They should feel heavy for their size and their tails should be tightly curled.

Prawns – Prawns are highly perishable in their raw state and so are often frozen or boiled at sea as soon as they are caught. If cooking with prawns, buy green (raw) prawns, as cooked prawns will toughen if reheated. Whether buying cooked or raw prawns look for firmly attached heads and tight, firm shells with a good sheen. There shouldn’t be any blackening around the head or legs as this is a sign of oxidation, and they should have a pleasant fresh sea smell. Buy 1kg of prawns in the shell to get about 500g of prawn meat.

Other Rocklobsters – Rocklobsters are usually sold live, as frozen green tails, or cooked whole (frozen or chilled). If possible buy live, in which case they should be lively with a hard shell (indicating that they haven’t recently moulted) and all limbs and antennae should be intact. Avoid green (raw dead) rocklobsters (except for frozen tails) as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead for and the flesh deteriorates very quickly. In cooked rocklobsters, look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. They should feel heavy for their size and their tails should be tightly curled.


Tropical Rocklobster

Tropical Rocklobster

Other Names

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Coral Crayfish
Doublespine Rocklobster
Green Crayfish
Ornate Rocklobster
Painted Crayfish
Rock Crayfish
Scalloped Lobster
Tropical Spinylobster

TROPICAL ROCKLOBSTER Substitutes

Crabs – Regardless of the type of crab, look for ones which feel heavy for their size and have their legs and claws intact. With dead crabs, if possible, give them a gentle shake to ensure there’s no sound of sloshing water. Live crabs should be vigorous.

Bugs – Bugs are usually sold whole, sometimes live but often already cooked. If possible buy live from a tank, in which case they should be lively with a hard shell (indicating that they haven’t recently moulted) and all legs and antennae should be intact. Unlike crabs and rocklobsters, bugs don’t survive well out of water; if buying chilled green (raw dead) bugs, ask when they were alive, they should only be stored chilled for about 48 hours before being cooked. In cooked bugs, look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. They should feel heavy for their size and their tails should be tightly curled.

Prawns – Prawns are highly perishable in their raw state and so are often frozen or boiled at sea as soon as they are caught. If cooking with prawns, buy green (raw) prawns, as cooked prawns will toughen if reheated. Whether buying cooked or raw prawns look for firmly attached heads and tight, firm shells with a good sheen. There shouldn’t be any blackening around the head or legs as this is a sign of oxidation, and they should have a pleasant fresh sea smell. Buy 1kg of prawns in the shell to get about 500g of prawn meat.

Other Rocklobsters – Rocklobsters are usually sold live, as frozen green tails, or cooked whole (frozen or chilled). If possible buy live, in which case they should be lively with a hard shell (indicating that they haven’t recently moulted) and all limbs and antennae should be intact. Avoid green (raw dead) rocklobsters (except for frozen tails) as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead for and the flesh deteriorates very quickly. In cooked rocklobsters, look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. They should feel heavy for their size and their tails should be tightly curled.


Western Rocklobster

Western Rocklobster

Other Names

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West Australian Crayfish
Western Cray
WESTERN ROCKLOBSTER Substitutes

Crabs – Regardless of the type of crab, look for ones which feel heavy for their size and have their legs and claws intact. With dead crabs, if possible, give them a gentle shake to ensure there’s no sound of sloshing water. Live crabs should be vigorous.

Bugs – Bugs are usually sold whole, sometimes live but often already cooked. If possible buy live from a tank, in which case they should be lively with a hard shell (indicating that they haven’t recently moulted) and all legs and antennae should be intact. Unlike crabs and rocklobsters, bugs don’t survive well out of water; if buying chilled green (raw dead) bugs, ask when they were alive, they should only be stored chilled for about 48 hours before being cooked. In cooked bugs, look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. They should feel heavy for their size and their tails should be tightly curled.

Prawns – Prawns are highly perishable in their raw state and so are often frozen or boiled at sea as soon as they are caught. If cooking with prawns, buy green (raw) prawns, as cooked prawns will toughen if reheated. Whether buying cooked or raw prawns look for firmly attached heads and tight, firm shells with a good sheen. There shouldn’t be any blackening around the head or legs as this is a sign of oxidation, and they should have a pleasant fresh sea smell. Buy 1kg of prawns in the shell to get about 500g of prawn meat.

Other Rocklobsters – Rocklobsters are usually sold live, as frozen green tails, or cooked whole (frozen or chilled). If possible buy live, in which case they should be lively with a hard shell (indicating that they haven’t recently moulted) and all limbs and antennae should be intact. Avoid green (raw dead) rocklobsters (except for frozen tails) as it’s hard to tell how long they’ve been dead for and the flesh deteriorates very quickly. In cooked rocklobsters, look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells, without any discolouration, particularly at joints, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. They should feel heavy for their size and their tails should be tightly curled.
See Glossary : xxxxxxxx


Atlantic Salmon

Atlantic Salmon

Other Names

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Content

Salmon

ATLANTIC SALMON Substitutes

Chinook (King) Salmon – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), in cutlet, steak and fillet forms, fresh, smoked and cured as gravlax. Roe is also available. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for orangey-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell.

Sea-Reared Rainbow Trout (Ocean Trout) – Freshwater-reared rainbow trout is mainly sold whole, fresh or smoked. Saltwater-reared fish, sold as “ocean trout”, is sold whole (gilled and gutted), in cutlet, steak and fillet forms, fresh, smoked and cured as gravlax, the bright orange roe is also available. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for pink to orange, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell; always buy sashimi-grade fish if serving it raw or rare.

Swordfish – Usually sold as steaks, but also sometimes as cutlets or sashimi. Look for cream-pale pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Trout – Saltwater reared fish are sold whole, in cutlet, steak and fillet forms, fresh, smoked and cured as gravlax; their bright orange roe is also widely available. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for pink-orange, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell; always buy sashimi-grade fish if serving it raw or rare.

Tuna – Tuna is usually sold as steaks, cutlets or sliced as sashimi. Look for pinkish red to burgundy flesh (colour varies with species and cut) that is firm, lustrous and moist without any dull brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Always buy sashimi-grade fish if it is to be served raw or rare

Yellowtail Kingfish – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), as cutlets, steaks and fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for white-dark pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Small fish are more flavourful, moist and tender, and are considered the best eating, as are those from colder waters.


Brook Trout (Saltwater Charr)

Brook Trout

Other Names

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Saltwater Charr
Speckled Trout
Squaretail Trout.

BROOK TROUT (Saltwater Charr) Substitutes

Salmon – Saltwater reared fish are sold whole, in cutlet, steak and fillet forms, fresh, smoked and cured as gravlax; their bright orange roe is also widely available. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for pink-orange, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell; always buy sashimi-grade fish if serving it raw or rare.

Yellowtail Kingfish – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), as cutlets, steaks and fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for white-dark pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Small fish are more flavourful, moist and tender, and are considered the best eating, as are those from colder waters.

Trout – Saltwater reared fish are sold whole, in cutlet, steak and fillet forms, fresh, smoked and cured as gravlax; their bright orange roe is also widely available. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for pink-orange, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell; always buy sashimi-grade fish if serving it raw or rare.


Chinook Salmon (King Salmon)

Chinook Salmon

Other Names

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Blackmouth
Black Salmon
Chub Salmon
Columbia River Salmon
Hamana
Hookbill Salmon
King Salmon
Pacific Salmon
Quinnat Salmon
Spring Salmon
Tyee Salmon
Winter Salmon

CHINOOK SALMON (King Salmon) Substitutes

Atlantic Salmon – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), in cutlet, steak and fillet forms, fresh, smoked and cured as gravlax. Roe is also widely available. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for orangey-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell.

Sea-Reared Rainbow Trout (Ocean Trout) – Freshwater-reared rainbow trout is mainly sold whole, fresh or smoked. Saltwater-reared fish, sold as “ocean trout”, is sold whole (gilled and gutted), in cutlet, steak and fillet forms, fresh, smoked and cured as gravlax, the bright orange roe is also available. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for pink to orange, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell; always buy sashimi-grade fish if serving it raw or rare.

Swordfish – Usually sold as steaks, but also sometimes as cutlets or sashimi. Look for cream-pale pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Trout – Saltwater reared fish are sold whole, in cutlet, steak and fillet forms, fresh, smoked and cured as gravlax; their bright orange roe is also widely available. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for pink-orange, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell; always buy sashimi-grade fish if serving it raw or rare.

Tuna – Tuna is usually sold as steaks, cutlets or sliced as sashimi. Look for pinkish red to burgundy flesh (colour varies with species and cut) that is firm, lustrous and moist without any dull brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Always buy sashimi-grade fish if it is to be served raw or rare

Yellowtail Kingfish – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), as cutlets, steaks and fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for white-dark pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Small fish are more flavourful, moist and tender, and are considered the best eating, as are those from colder waters.


Rainbow Trout (Ocean Trout)

Rainbow Trout

Other Names

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Coast Range Trout
Hardhead
Kamloops
Ocean Trout
Redband Trout
Salmon Trout
Sea-Run Trout
Silver Trout
Steelhead

RAINBOW TROUT (Ocean Trout) Substitutes

Salmon – Saltwater reared fish are sold whole, in cutlet, steak and fillet forms, fresh, smoked and cured as gravlax; their bright orange roe is also widely available. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for pink-orange, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell; always buy sashimi-grade fish if serving it raw or rare.

Yellowtail Kingfish – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), as cutlets, steaks and fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for white-dark pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Small fish are more flavourful, moist and tender, and are considered the best eating, as are those from colder waters.

Trout – Saltwater reared fish are sold whole, in cutlet, steak and fillet forms, fresh, smoked and cured as gravlax; their bright orange roe is also widely available. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for pink-orange, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell; always buy sashimi-grade fish if serving it raw or rare.
See Glossary : xxxxxxxx


Commercial Scallops

Commercial Scallops

Other Names

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Common Scallop
King Scallop
Scallop
Sea Scallop
Southern Scallop
Tasmanian Scallop
Tassie Scallop

COMMERCIAL SCALLOPS Substitutes

Nothing matches the flavour and texture of a perfectly cooked Scallop, but Blue Mussels can often be substituted in recipes calling for Scallops on the half shell.


Saucer Scallops

Saucer Scallop

Other Names

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Queensland Scallop
Scallop
White Scallop
Mud Scallop
Asian Moon Scallop

SAUCER SCALLOPS Substitutes

Nothing matches the flavour and texture of a perfectly cooked Scallop, but Blue Mussels can often be substituted in recipes calling for Scallops on the half shell.
See Glossary : xxxxxxxx


Bailer Shell

Bailer Shell

Other Names

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Red Bailer (False Bailer)
Diadem Volute
Giant Baler
Heavy Baler
Milton’s Melon
Southern Bailer
Umbilicate Melon Shell (Melon Shell)
Baler Shell
Black Bailer
Boat Shell
Common Bailer
Poor Man’s Abalone

BAILER SHELL Substitutes

Abalone – Abalone is available in the shell (live or frozen), as meat (frozen and vacuum-packed or dried). Farmed “cocktail” Abalone is generally less expensive than Abalone harvested from the wild.


Periwinkle

Periwinkle

Other Names

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Sea Snail
Turban
Turbo
Warrener
Wary Turbo

PERIWINKLE Substitutes

Trochus – Sold live. Look for brightly coloured, intact, lustrous shells, firm flesh that retracts when touched (showing that it’s still alive), and a pleasant fresh sea smell.


Trochus

Trochus

Other Names

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Button Shell
Periwinkle
Top Shell

TROCHUS Substitutes

Periwinkle – Sold live. Look for brightly coloured, intact, lustrous shells, firm flesh that retracts when touched (showing that it’s still alive), and a pleasant fresh sea smell.
See Glossary : xxxxxxxx


Cuttlefish

Cuttlefish

Other Names

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Golden Cuttlefish
Smith’s Cuttlefish
CUTTLEFISH Substitutes

Squids – When purchasing fresh whole squid look for intact bright skin, with a light brown to purple mottled appearance, intact head, arms and tentacles and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Cleaned tubes should be white without any brown markings.

Calamari – When purchasing fresh whole calamari look for intact bright skin, with a light brown to purple mottled appearance, intact head, arms and tentacles and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Cleaned tubes should be white without any brown markings.

And, in some recipes, Octopus – When purchasing fresh whole octopus look for intact bright skin, intact head and arms, and a pleasant fresh sea smell.


Gould’s Squid

Goulds Squid

Other Names

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Aero Squid
Aeroplane Squid,
Arrow Squid
Seine Boat Squid
Seined Squid
Torpedo Squid

GOULD’S SQUID Substitutes

Other Squids – When purchasing fresh whole squid look for intact bright skin, with a light brown to purple mottled appearance, intact head, arms and tentacles and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Cleaned tubes should be white without any brown markings.

Cuttlefish – When purchasing fresh whole cuttlefish look for intact bright skin, intact head, arms and tentacles and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Cleaned tubes should be white without any brown markings.

Calamari – When purchasing fresh whole calamari look for intact bright skin, with a light brown to purple mottled appearance, intact head, arms and tentacles and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Cleaned tubes should be white without any brown markings.

And, in some recipes, Octopus – When purchasing fresh whole octopus look for intact bright skin, intact head and arms, and a pleasant fresh sea smell.


Loligo Squid

Loligo Squid

Other Names

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Hawkesbury Squid
Hawkesbury Calamari

LOLIGO SQUID Substitutes

Other Squids – When purchasing fresh whole squid look for intact bright skin, with a light brown to purple mottled appearance, intact head, arms and tentacles and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Cleaned tubes should be white without any brown markings.

Cuttlefish – When purchasing fresh whole cuttlefish look for intact bright skin, intact head, arms and tentacles and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Cleaned tubes should be white without any brown markings.

Calamari – When purchasing fresh whole calamari look for intact bright skin, with a light brown to purple mottled appearance, intact head, arms and tentacles and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Cleaned tubes should be white without any brown markings.

And, in some recipes, Octopus – When purchasing fresh whole octopus look for intact bright skin, intact head and arms, and a pleasant fresh sea smell.


Luminous Bay Squid

Luminous Bay Squid

Other Names

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Bottle Squid

LUMINOUS BAY SQUID Substitutes

Other Squids – When purchasing fresh whole squid look for intact bright skin, with a light brown to purple mottled appearance, intact head, arms and tentacles and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Cleaned tubes should be white without any brown markings.

Cuttlefish – When purchasing fresh whole cuttlefish look for intact bright skin, intact head, arms and tentacles and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Cleaned tubes should be white without any brown markings.

Calamari – When purchasing fresh whole calamari look for intact bright skin, with a light brown to purple mottled appearance, intact head, arms and tentacles and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Cleaned tubes should be white without any brown markings.

And, in some recipes, Octopus – When purchasing fresh whole octopus look for intact bright skin, intact head and arms, and a pleasant fresh sea smell.


Northern Calamari

Northern Calamari

Other Names

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Calamari
Calamary
Squid
Tiger Squid

NORTHERN CALAMARI Substitutes

Other Calamari – When purchasing fresh whole calamari look for intact bright skin, with a light brown to purple mottled appearance, intact head, arms and tentacles and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Cleaned tubes should be white without any brown markings.

Squids – When purchasing fresh whole squid look for intact bright skin, with a light brown to purple mottled appearance, intact head, arms and tentacles and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Cleaned tubes should be white without any brown markings.

Cuttlefish – When purchasing fresh whole cuttlefish look for intact bright skin, intact head, arms and tentacles and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Cleaned tubes should be white without any brown markings.

And, in some recipes, Octopus – When purchasing fresh whole octopus look for intact bright skin, intact head and arms, and a pleasant fresh sea smell.


Southern Calamari

Southern Calamari

Other Names

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Calamari
Calamary
Grass Squid
Squid

SOUTHERN CALAMARI Substitutes

Other Calamari – When purchasing fresh whole calamari look for intact bright skin, with a light brown to purple mottled appearance, intact head, arms and tentacles and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Cleaned tubes should be white without any brown markings.

Squids – When purchasing fresh whole squid look for intact bright skin, with a light brown to purple mottled appearance, intact head, arms and tentacles and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Cleaned tubes should be white without any brown markings.

Cuttlefish – When purchasing fresh whole cuttlefish look for intact bright skin, intact head, arms and tentacles and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Cleaned tubes should be white without any brown markings.

And, in some recipes, Octopus – When purchasing fresh whole octopus look for intact bright skin, intact head and arms, and a pleasant fresh sea smell.
See Glossary : xxxxxxxx


Black Pomfret

Black Pomfret

Other Names

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Black Batfish
Blue Skate
Butterfish
Doggie
Halibut
Slade
Turbot

BLACK POMFRET Substitutes

King Dory – Sold mostly in fillet form, fresh and frozen. In fillets, look for yellowish-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Mirror Dory – Sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form (usually skin on). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pale pinkish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Silver Dory – Sold mostly in fillet form, fresh and frozen. In fillets, look for yellowish-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.


Dart

Swallowtailed Dart

Other Names

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Black-Spotted Dart
Black-Spotted Swallowtail
Buck-Nosed Trevally
Oyster Cracker
Oyster-Eater
Pompano
Pumpkin Fish
Snub-Nosed Dart
Snub-Nosed Swallowtail
Southern Swallowtail
Surf Bream
Surf Trevally
Swallow Tail Dart
Swallowtail

DART Substitutes

Silver Perch – Sold whole (gilled and gutted) and fillet forms. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh smell. In fillets, look for creamy-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell.

Morwong – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet form (often skinned). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for creamy pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Gemfish – A very versatile fish. With its firm to medium texture, large flake and medium flavour, it holds its shape using a range of cooking methods, including shallow frying, grilling, poaching, steaming and smoking. Deep frying and poaching help keep the flesh moist.

Warehou – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), and as fillets, usually skinned. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for off-white to yellowish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Yellowtail Scad – Sold whole; look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell.


Jack Mackerel

Jack Mackerel

Other Names

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Cowanyoung
Horse Mackerel
Scad

JACK MACKEREL Substitutes

Australian Salmon – Sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pale pink to brown, firm, lustrous flesh without any discolouration or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Blue Mackerel – Sold mainly whole (gilled and gutted) as the meat darkens very quickly once cut. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets and fillets, look for bright reddish-brown, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any dark brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Mullet – Mullets are usually sold as skinless fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pinkish-grey, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Yellowtail Scad – Sold whole; look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell.


Queenfish

Queenfish

Other Names

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Deep Leatherskin
Double-Spotted Queenfish
Giant Dart
Giant Leatherskin
Leatherskin
Needle-Scaled Queenfish
Queenie
Skinny
Skinnyfish
Slender Leatherskin
Talang Queenfish

QUEENFISH Substitutes

Silver Perch – Sold whole (gilled and gutted) and fillet forms. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh smell. In fillets, look for creamy-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell.

Morwong – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet form (often skinned). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for creamy pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Gemfish – A very versatile fish. With its firm to medium texture, large flake and medium flavour, it holds its shape using a range of cooking methods, including shallow frying, grilling, poaching, steaming and smoking. Deep frying and poaching help keep the flesh moist.

Warehou – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), and as fillets, usually skinned. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for off-white to yellowish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Samsonfish – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet and cutlet forms. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets and cutlets, look for pale pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. The flesh discolours quickly once cut, so it is best to buy whole fish.

Snapper – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), in cutlet/steak and fillet (often skinned) forms. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for cream-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.


Samsonfish

Samsonfish

Other Names

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Allied Kingfish
Sambo
Samson
Samson Fish
Sea King Fish
Sea Kingfish

SAMSONFISH Substitutes

Silver Perch – Sold whole (gilled and gutted) and fillet forms. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh smell. In fillets, look for creamy-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell.

Morwong – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet form (often skinned). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for creamy pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Gemfish – A very versatile fish. With its firm to medium texture, large flake and medium flavour, it holds its shape using a range of cooking methods, including shallow frying, grilling, poaching, steaming and smoking. Deep frying and poaching help keep the flesh moist.

Warehou – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), and as fillets, usually skinned. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for off-white to yellowish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Snapper – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), in cutlet/steak and fillet (often skinned) forms. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for cream-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Queenfish – Sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pale reddish-brown, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Yellowtail Kingfish – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), as cutlets, steaks and fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for white-dark pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Small fish are more flavourful, moist and tender, and are considered the best eating, as are those from colder waters.


Silver Trevally

Silver Trevally

Other Names

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Blurter
Ranger
Sand Trevally
Silver Bream
Skippy
Skipjack Trevally
White Trevally

SILVER TREVALLY Substitutes

Silver Perch – Sold whole (gilled and gutted) and fillet forms. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh smell. In fillets, look for creamy-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell.

Morwong – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet form (often skinned). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for creamy pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Gemfish – A very versatile fish. With its firm to medium texture, large flake and medium flavour, it holds its shape using a range of cooking methods, including shallow frying, grilling, poaching, steaming and smoking. Deep frying and poaching help keep the flesh moist.

Warehou – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), and as fillets, usually skinned. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for off-white to yellowish, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Snapper – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), in cutlet/steak and fillet (often skinned) forms. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for cream-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Other Trevallys – Larger fish are sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet form, with yellowtail kingfish also sold as steaks and cutlets; smaller fish, such as yellowtail scad, are usually only seen whole. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for pinky-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.


Yellowtail Kingfish

Yellowtail Kingfish

Other Names

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Albacore
Bandit
Hoodlum
King Amberjack
Kingfish
Kingie
Silver King
Southern Yellowtail
Tasmanian Yellowtail
Yellowtail
Yellowtail Amberjack

YELLOWTAIL KINGFISH Substitutes

Grey Mackerel – Sold mainly as cutlets and steaks. In cutlets and steaks look for bright pinkish-red, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any dark brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

School Mackerel – Sold mainly as cutlets and steaks. In cutlets and steaks look for bright whitish-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any dark brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Spanish Mackerel – Sold mainly as cutlets and steaks. In cutlets and steaks look for bright off-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any dark brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Striped Marlin – Usually sold as steaks. Look for reddish-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Swordfish – Usually sold as steaks, but also sometimes as cutlets or sashimi. Look for cream-pale pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Tuna – Tuna is usually sold as steaks, cutlets or sliced as sashimi. Look for pinkish red to burgundy flesh (colour varies with species and cut) that is firm, lustrous and moist without any dull brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Always buy sashimi-grade fish if it is to be served raw or rare.


Yellowtail Scad

Yellowtail Scad

Other Names

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Scad
Yellowtail
Yellowtail Horse Mackerel

YELLOWTAIL SCAD Substitutes

Australian Salmon – Sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pale pink to brown, firm, lustrous flesh without any discolouration or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Blue Mackerel – Sold mainly whole (gilled and gutted) as the meat darkens very quickly once cut. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets and fillets, look for bright reddish-brown, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any dark brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Mullet – Mullets are usually sold as skinless fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for pinkish-grey, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Sardines – Sold whole and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for reddish-brown, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Other Trevallys – Larger fish are sold whole (gilled and gutted), and in fillet form, with yellowtail kingfish also sold as steaks and cutlets; smaller fish, such as yellowtail scad, are usually only seen whole. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for pinky-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.
See Glossary : xxxxxxxx


Albacore

Albacore

Other Names

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Albacore tuna

ALBACORE Substitutes

Mackerels – Blue Mackerel are often sold whole or as fillets, and the larger Mackerels are usually seen as cutlets or steaks. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets look for bright flesh that’s dark red in Blue Mackerel, and pinky-white in the larger Mackerels, with Spanish Mackerel virtually white. It should be firm, lustrous and moist without any dark brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Striped Marlin – Usually sold as steaks. Look for reddish-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Swordfish – Usually sold as steaks, but also sometimes as cutlets or sashimi. Look for cream-pale pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Tunas – Tuna is usually sold as steaks, cutlets or sliced as sashimi. Look for pinkish red to burgundy flesh (colour varies with species and cut) that is firm, lustrous and moist without any dull brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Always buy sashimi-grade fish if it is to be served raw or rare.


Bigeye Tuna

Bigeye Tuna

Other Names

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Bigeye
Big Eye Tuna

BIGEYE TUNA Substitutes

Atlantic Salmon – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), in cutlet, steak and fillet forms, fresh, smoked and cured as gravlax. Roe is also widely available. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for orangey-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell.

Marlins – Usually sold as steaks. Look for reddish-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Mackerels – Blue Mackerel are often sold whole or as fillets, and the larger Mackerels are usually seen as cutlets or steaks. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets look for bright flesh that’s dark red in Blue Mackerel, and pinky-white in the larger Mackerels, with Spanish Mackerel virtually white. It should be firm, lustrous and moist without any dark brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Swordfish – Usually sold as steaks, but also sometimes as cutlets or sashimi. Look for cream-pale pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Other Tunas – Tuna is usually sold as steaks, cutlets or sliced as sashimi. Look for pinkish red to burgundy flesh (colour varies with species and cut) that is firm, lustrous and moist without any dull brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Always buy sashimi-grade fish if it is to be served raw or rare.

Yellowtail Kingfish – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), as cutlets, steaks and fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for white-dark pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Small fish are more flavourful, moist and tender, and are considered the best eating, as are those from colder waters.


Bonito

australian bonito

Other Names

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Bunny
Common Bonito
Horse Mackerel
Little Bonito
Tuna (Australian)
Watson’s Leaping Bonito (Leaping)

BONITO Substitutes

Atlantic Salmon – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), in cutlet, steak and fillet forms, fresh, smoked and cured as gravlax. Roe is also widely available. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for orangey-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell.

Marlins – Usually sold as steaks. Look for reddish-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Mackerels – Blue Mackerel are often sold whole or as fillets, and the larger Mackerels are usually seen as cutlets or steaks. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets look for bright flesh that’s dark red in Blue Mackerel, and pinky-white in the larger Mackerels, with Spanish Mackerel virtually white. It should be firm, lustrous and moist without any dark brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Swordfish – Usually sold as steaks, but also sometimes as cutlets or sashimi. Look for cream-pale pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Other Tunas – Tuna is usually sold as steaks, cutlets or sliced as sashimi. Look for pinkish red to burgundy flesh (colour varies with species and cut) that is firm, lustrous and moist without any dull brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Always buy sashimi-grade fish if it is to be served raw or rare.

Yellowtail Kingfish – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), as cutlets, steaks and fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for white-dark pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Small fish are more flavourful, moist and tender, and are considered the best eating, as are those from colder waters.


Longtail Tuna

Longtail Tuna

Other Names

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Northern Bluefin Tuna
Bluefin Tuna
LONGTAIL TUNA Substitutes

Atlantic Salmon – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), in cutlet, steak and fillet forms, fresh, smoked and cured as gravlax. Roe is also widely available. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for orangey-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell.

Marlins – Usually sold as steaks. Look for reddish-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Mackerels – Blue Mackerel are often sold whole or as fillets, and the larger Mackerels are usually seen as cutlets or steaks. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets look for bright flesh that’s dark red in Blue Mackerel, and pinky-white in the larger Mackerels, with Spanish Mackerel virtually white. It should be firm, lustrous and moist without any dark brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Swordfish – Usually sold as steaks, but also sometimes as cutlets or sashimi. Look for cream-pale pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Other Tunas – Tuna is usually sold as steaks, cutlets or sliced as sashimi. Look for pinkish red to burgundy flesh (colour varies with species and cut) that is firm, lustrous and moist without any dull brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Always buy sashimi-grade fish if it is to be served raw or rare.

Yellowtail Kingfish – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), as cutlets, steaks and fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for white-dark pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Small fish are more flavourful, moist and tender, and are considered the best eating, as are those from colder waters.


Southern Bluefin Tuna

Southern Bluefin Tuna

Other Names

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Bluefin Tuna
Bluefin
SBT
Tuna
Tunny

SOUTHERN BLUEFIN TUNA Substitutes

Atlantic Salmon – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), in cutlet, steak and fillet forms, fresh, smoked and cured as gravlax. Roe is also widely available. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for orangey-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell.

Swordfish – Usually sold as steaks, but also sometimes as cutlets or sashimi. Look for cream-pale pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Other Tunas – Tuna is usually sold as steaks, cutlets or sliced as sashimi. Look for pinkish red to burgundy flesh (colour varies with species and cut) that is firm, lustrous and moist without any dull brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Always buy sashimi-grade fish if it is to be served raw or rare.

Yellowtail Kingfish – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), as cutlets, steaks and fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for white-dark pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Small fish are more flavourful, moist and tender, and are considered the best eating, as are those from colder waters.


Yellowfin Tuna

Yellowfin Tuna

Other Names

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Allison Tuna
Autumn Albacore
Yellowfin
Yellowfinned Albacore
Yellowfin Tunny

YELLOWFIN TUNA Substitutes

Atlantic Salmon – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), in cutlet, steak and fillet forms, fresh, smoked and cured as gravlax. Roe is also widely available. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for orangey-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh smell.

Marlins – Usually sold as steaks. Look for reddish-pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Mackerels – Blue Mackerel are often sold whole or as fillets, and the larger Mackerels are usually seen as cutlets or steaks. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets look for bright flesh that’s dark red in Blue Mackerel, and pinky-white in the larger Mackerels, with Spanish Mackerel virtually white. It should be firm, lustrous and moist without any dark brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Swordfish – Usually sold as steaks, but also sometimes as cutlets or sashimi. Look for cream-pale pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Other Tunas – Tuna is usually sold as steaks, cutlets or sliced as sashimi. Look for pinkish red to burgundy flesh (colour varies with species and cut) that is firm, lustrous and moist without any dull brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Always buy sashimi-grade fish if it is to be served raw or rare.

Yellowtail Kingfish – Sold whole (gilled and gutted), as cutlets, steaks and fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In cutlets, steaks and fillets, look for white-dark pink, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Small fish are more flavourful, moist and tender, and are considered the best eating, as are those from colder waters.
See Glossary : xxxxxxxx


King George Whiting

King George Whiting

Other Names

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Black Whiting
South Australian Whiting
Spotted Whiting

KING GEORGE WHITING Substitutes

Dory – Dories are sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form (usually skin on, as the most highly prized, John dory, is identified by the dark spot on its side). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. John dory flesh is white, whereas mirror dory has a pink tinge and silver and king dories are slightly yellowish.

Flathead – Flatheads are sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for yellowish-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings (dark veining may be visible in some species) or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Flounder – Flounders are sold as a whole fish (or sometimes as thin fillets and usually skinned, although the skin is edible). Whole flounder is good sautéed, steamed or roasted. Fillets are excellent sautéed with a coating of flour or light breading to crisp the soft flesh and prevent them from falling apart.

Garfish – A small sweet fish with excellent, delicate flesh, though many people avoid them bacause they can be bony. Ask your fishmonger to butterfly them for you if you are worried about this.

Other Whitings – Whiting are sold whole (gilled and gutted), as trunks (headless), and in single and butterflied fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Sand and Yellowfin Whitings tend to naturally have a faintly yellow hue to their flesh.

Sand Whiting

Sand Whiting

Other Names

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Silver Whiting
Summer Whiting
SAND WHITING Substitutes

Dory – Dories are sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form (usually skin on, as the most highly prized, John Dory, is identified by the dark spot on its side). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. John Dory flesh is white, whereas mirror dory has a pink tinge and silver and king dories are slightly yellowish.

Flathead – Flatheads are sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for yellowish-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings (dark veining may be visible in some species) or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Flounder – Flounders are sold as a whole fish (or sometimes as thin fillets and usually skinned, although the skin is edible). Whole flounder is good sautéed, steamed or roasted. Fillets are excellent sautéed with a coating of flour or light breading to crisp the soft flesh and prevent them from falling apart.

Garfish – A small sweet fish with excellent, delicate flesh, though many people avoid them bacause they can be bony. Ask your fishmonger to butterfly them for you if you are worried about this.

Other Whitings – Whiting are sold whole (gilled and gutted), as trunks (headless), and in single and butterflied fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Sand and Yellowfin Whitings tend to naturally have a faintly yellow hue to their flesh.

School Whiting

Stout Whiting

Other Names

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Silver Whiting
School Whiting
Bass Whiting (Western School)
Redspot Whiting
Silver Whiting
Trawl Whiting

SCHOOL WHITING Substitutes

Dory – Dories are sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form (usually skin on, as the most highly prized, John Dory, is identified by the dark spot on its side). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. John Dory flesh is white, whereas mirror dory has a pink tinge and silver and king dories are slightly yellowish.

Flathead – Flatheads are sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for yellowish-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings (dark veining may be visible in some species) or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Flounder – Flounders are sold as a whole fish (or sometimes as thin fillets and usually skinned, although the skin is edible). Whole flounder is good sautéed, steamed or roasted. Fillets are excellent sautéed with a coating of flour or light breading to crisp the soft flesh and prevent them from falling apart.

Garfish – A small sweet fish with excellent, delicate flesh, though many people avoid them bacause they can be bony. Ask your fishmonger to butterfly them for you if you are worried about this.

Other Whitings – Whiting are sold whole (gilled and gutted), as trunks (headless), and in single and butterflied fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Sand and Yellowfin Whitings tend to naturally have a faintly yellow hue to their flesh.

Trumpeter Whiting

Trumpeter (winter) whiting

Other Names

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Diver Whiting
Winter Whiting
Spotted Whiting

TRUMPETER WHITING Substitutes

Dory – Dories are sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form (usually skin on, as the most highly prized, John Dory, is identified by the dark spot on its side). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. John Dory flesh is white, whereas mirror dory has a pink tinge and silver and king dories are slightly yellowish.

Flathead – Flatheads are sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for yellowish-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings (dark veining may be visible in some species) or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Flounder – Flounders are sold as a whole fish (or sometimes as thin fillets and usually skinned, although the skin is edible). Whole flounder is good sautéed, steamed or roasted. Fillets are excellent sautéed with a coating of flour or light breading to crisp the soft flesh and prevent them from falling apart.

Garfish – A small sweet fish with excellent, delicate flesh, though many people avoid them bacause they can be bony. Ask your fishmonger to butterfly them for you if you are worried about this.

Other Whitings – Whiting are sold whole (gilled and gutted), as trunks (headless), and in single and butterflied fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Sand and Yellowfin Whitings tend to naturally have a faintly yellow hue to their flesh.

Yellowfin Whiting

Yellowfin Whiting

Other Names

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Fine-Scale Whiting
Silver Whiting
Western Sand Whiting

YELLOWFIN WHITING Substitutes

Dory – Dories are sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form (usually skin on, as the most highly prized, John Dory, is identified by the dark spot on its side). In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. John Dory flesh is white, whereas mirror dory has a pink tinge and silver and king dories are slightly yellowish.

Flathead – Flatheads are sold whole (gilled and gutted) and in fillet form. In whole fish look for lustrous skin with a slippery, mucilaginous coating, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for yellowish-white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings (dark veining may be visible in some species) or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell.

Flounder – Flounders are sold as a whole fish (or sometimes as thin fillets and usually skinned, although the skin is edible). Whole flounder is good sautéed, steamed or roasted. Fillets are excellent sautéed with a coating of flour or light breading to crisp the soft flesh and prevent them from falling apart.

Garfish – A small sweet fish with excellent, delicate flesh, though many people avoid them bacause they can be bony. Ask your fishmonger to butterfly them for you if you are worried about this.

Other Whitings – Whiting are sold whole (gilled and gutted), as trunks (headless), and in single and butterflied fillets. In whole fish look for lustrous skin, firm flesh, and a pleasant, fresh sea smell. In fillets, look for white, firm, lustrous, moist flesh without any brown markings or oozing water and with a pleasant fresh sea smell. Sand and Yellowfin Whitings tend to naturally have a faintly yellow hue to their flesh
See Glossary : xxxxxxxx


Octopus

Octopus

Other Names

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Hammer Octopus
Brown Octopus (Southern)
Pink Octopus
White Octopus (Pale)

OCTOPUS Substitutes

Squids, Calamari and Cuttlefish – When purchasing fresh whole squid look for intact bright skin, with a light brown to purple mottled appearance and intact head, arms and tentacles. Cleaned tubes should be white without any brown markings.
See Glossary : xxxxxxxx


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John Doe
Professor of Botanics
Born and raised in Dublin, Ireland, John is a superior specialist in growing palms and exotic plants.
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