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Culinary Fruits – List of

This list of culinary fruits contains the names of some fruits that are considered edible in some cuisines.

The word “fruit” is used in several different ways. The definition of fruit for this list is a culinary fruit, i.e. “Any sweet, edible part of a plant that resembles fruit, even if it does not develop from a floral ovary; also used in a technically imprecise sense for some sweet or sweetish vegetables, some of which may resemble a true fruit or are used in cookery as if they were a fruit, for example rhubarb.”

Note that many edible plant parts that are true fruits botanically speaking, are not considered culinary fruits. They are classified as vegetables in the culinary sense, (for example: the tomato, cucumber, zucchini, and so on), and hence they do not appear in this list. Similarly, some botanical fruits are classified as nuts (e.g. Brazil nut and various almonds), or staples (e.g. breadfruit), and likewise do not appear here. There also exist many fruits which are edible and palatable but for various reasons have not become popular.

Alphabetical list of Culinary Fruits

Name Image Description
Abiu Abiu (Pouteria caimito) The inside of the fruit is translucent and white. It has a creamy and jelly-like texture and its taste is similar to the sapodilla.

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Açaí Acai Berry In the general consumer market, açaí is sold as frozen pulp, juice, or an ingredient in various products from beverages, including grain alcohol, smoothies, foods, cosmetics and supplements.

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Acerola Acerola - Barbados Cherries Common names include acerola, Barbados cherry, West Indian cherry and wild crepemyrtle. Acerola is native to South America, Southern Mexico and Central America.

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Ackee ackee The ackee, also known as achee, akee apple or akee (Blighia sapida) is a member of the Sapindaceae (soapberry family), native to tropical West Africa.

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African Cherry Orange West African cherry orange The African cherry orange, Citropsis articulata, also known as the West African cherry orange or Uganda cherry orange (locally as omuboro) is a small citrus fruit about the size of a tangerine.

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African Mango African Mango - Irvingia The fruit is a large drupe, with fibrous flesh. The subtly aromatic nuts are typically dried in the sun for preservation, and are sold whole or in powder form.

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Algerian Tangerine Clementine Refer to Clementine

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Allspice Whole allspice berries Allspice is a spice that is the dried unripe fruit (“berries”) of Pimenta dioica.

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Amanatsu Amanatsu The rough textured fruit is easy to peel and is commonly eaten fresh. It is also used for wide variety of products ranging from marmalade to alcoholic beverages.

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Ambarella Ripe and Unripe Ambarella The fruit may be eaten raw; the flesh is crunchy and a little sour. In Indonesia and Malaysia, it is eaten with shrimp paste, a thick, black, salty-sweet sauce called hayko in the Southern Min dialect of Chinese.

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American Black Elderberry
American Persimmon Common Persimmon xxxx

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Apple Apple Varieties in Australia Different varieties are grown in different areas of Australia and are picked at different times of the year.

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Apple, Malay
Apple, custard
Apple, elephant
Apple, kei, see key apple
Apple, mammee
Apricot Apricot Recipes The majority of ripe apricot crops are dried, with often less than ¼ of the harvest coming to the market fresh.

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Araza Araza A really sour, yellow, softball sized fruit that has a thin outer peel. So thin in fact that this fruit is not exported because it travels so poorly.

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Arbequina Arbequina A cultivar of olives. The fruit is highly aromatic, small, symmetrical and dark brown, with a rounded apex and a broad peduncular cavity.

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Arhat The plant is most prized for its sweet fruits, which are used for medicinal purposes and as a sweetener. The fruits are generally sold in dried form, and traditionally used in herbal tea or soup.
Asian Persimmon Asian persimmon The most widely cultivated species of the Diospyros genus. There are two types of fruit, Astringent and Non-astringent.

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Atemoya
Atherton Raspberry
Avocado Cut and Whole Avocado The fruit is not sweet, but rich, and distinctly yet subtly flavoured, and of smooth, almost creamy texture. It is used in both savoury and sweet dishes, though in many countries not for both.

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Babaco
Bacupari A fruit native to Brazil. Bacupari are yellow fruit with edible arils that have a sweet, pleasantly acidic taste and are said to have good anti-cancer properties. It is well known in Brazil as “bacupari” or “mangostão-amarelo” and is a very adaptable plant that will grow in any tropical or warm temperate climate and even take an occasional light frost.
Bacuri
Bael, or Woodapple
Balady Citron Balady Citron Balady citron, is a variety of citron, or etrog, grown in Israel for Jewish ritual purposes.

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Banana Bananas Believed to have originated up to 10,000 years ago and some scientists believe they may have been the world’s first fruit.

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Barbadine
Barbados Cherry Acerola - Barbados Cherries Refer to Acerola

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Batuan
Beach Plum
Bearberry
Bergamot Orange Bergamot Oranges The fruit looks more like a lime or lemon and has no resemblance to an orange at all. The fruit has an acidic taste and very aromatic. The fruit is used for the oil in the skin which is extracted and used to flavour teas such as Earl Grey and perfumes.

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Betel Nut
Bigarade Orange Refer to Bitter Orange

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Bignay
Bilberry
Bilimbi
Biribi
Bitter Melon
Bitter Orange The unripe fruit is commonly used in Southern Indian cuisine, especially in Tamil cuisine. The juice from the ripe fruit is also used as a marinade for meat in Nicaraguan, Cuban, Dominican and Haitian cooking.

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Black Apple
Black Cherry
Black Raspberry
Black Mulberry
Black Sapote
Black Walnut
Blackberry Ripe Blackberries Delicious in pies, crumbles, ice cream, jams and summer desserts and are a natural pair for the first of the cooking apples that come into season.

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Blood Orange The blood orange is a variety of orange with crimson, almost-blood-coloured flesh. The fruit is smaller than an average orange; its skin is usually pitted, but can be smooth. Look for them in the winter and spring.
Blue tongue
Blueberry
Bolivian Coconut The fruits, or cocos, grow 5-10cm in diameter in clusters weighing up to 15kg. The seeds contain coconut milk until they dry out. They are also coated with a thick yellow rind like regular coconuts. It’s just all miniature !
Bolwarra
Boquila
Bottle Gourd
Brazilian Guava
Breadnut
Breadnut, Mayan see Mayan Breadnut
Broad-leaf Bramble
Buah Badai
Buddha’s Hand
Buffaloberry
Burdekin Plum
Burmese Grape
Bush Tomato The flavour is initially caramel-like, yet after about 30 seconds develops a somewhat bitter, lingering aftertaste which leaves the palate unexpectedly refreshed, similar to green tomatoes.

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Button Mangosteen
Caimito
Calabash Tree
Calamansi Calamondin Refer to Calamondin

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Calamondin Calamondin The Calamondin bears a small citrus fruit that is used to flavour foods and drinks. Despite its outer appearance and its aroma, the taste of the fruit itself is quite sour, although the peel is sweet.

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Cam Sành Cam Sanh The cam sành is a cultivar of citrus fruit similar to an orange, originating in Vietnam. The fruit may be easily recognised by its thick skin, which is typically bright green. Its flesh is orange, dark and sweet.

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CamuCamu
Canary Melon
Canistel
Cantaloupe
Cape Gooseberry Physalis peruviana Cape Gooseberry is a berry which looks like a marble with a small round shape. The fruit consists of numerous small yellow seeds.

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Capuli Cherry
Carambola The entire fruit is edible, including the slightly waxy skin. The flesh is crunchy, firm, and extremely juicy. It does not contain fibres and has a texture similar in consistency to that of grapes. Carambolas are best consumed shortly after they ripen, when they are yellow with a light shade of green or just after all the traces of green has disappeared. They will also have brown ridges at the edges and feel firm.
Cardón
Carob
Cashew Apple
Cassabanana Cassabanana Sweetly scented and resembles a yellow-orange, orange-red, or maroon-black cucumber. Smooth glossy skin surrounds yellow to orange pulp.

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Cattley Guava
Cawesh
Cedar Bay Cherry
Ceriman
Cereus Peruvianus
Ceylon Gooseberry
Charichuelo
Chayote Choko  Refer to Choko

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Che
Chempedak
Chenet
Cherimoya The cherimoya looks like no other fruit, it’s a cross between being heart-shaped and round with rough-textured but thin skin which varies from a yellow-greenish tinge to dark green. The fruit or pulp is very creamy and juicy usually a creamy white colour with a few dark seeds found within it.
Cherry Cherries are loved for their delicious flavour and ruby red colour and can be enjoyed in many ways every day – they are perfect for a summer picnic, lunchbox treat or festive family feast. They are also a smart choice when it comes to summer snacking as they contain no fat or cholesterol and are jam-packed with antioxidants. Other phytonutrients contained in cherries may even offer protection against heart disease, reduce inflammation, and ease arthritis and gout pain!
Cherry Ballart
Cherry of the Rio Grande
Chilean Guava
Chinese Jujube
Chinese Olive
Chinese Quince
Chokeberry
Chokecherry
Chupa-Chupa
Citron Citron The main content of a citron fruit is the thick white rind, which adheres to the segments, and cannot be separated from them easily.

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Clementine Clementine The clementine is not always easy to distinguish from other varieties of mandarin oranges. As such, it should not be confused with similar fruit such as the satsuma or honey sweet orange, or other popular varieties.

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Cloudberry cloudberry These berries are often used in candies, jams, alcoholic drinks, and various other baked goods. They can also be eaten raw, but the flavour is quite tart, so most prepare some sort of sweetened recipe.

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Cluster Fig
Cocky Apple
Coco Plum
Cocona
Coconut The various parts of the coconut have a number of culinary uses. The nut provides oil for frying, cooking, and making margarine. The white, fleshy part of the seed, the coconut meat, is used fresh or dried in cooking, especially in confections and desserts such as macaroons. Desiccated coconut or coconut milk made from it is frequently added to curries and other savoury dishes. Coconut flour has also been developed for use in baking, to combat malnutrition. Coconut chips have been sold in the tourist regions of Hawaii and the Caribbean. Coconut butter is often used to describe solidified coconut oil, but has also been adopted as a name by certain specialty products made of coconut milk solids or puréed coconut meat and oil.
Cocoplum
Coffee Coffee berries and their seeds undergo several processes before they become the familiar roasted coffee. Berries have been traditionally selectively picked by hand; a labour intensive method, it involves the selection of only the berries at the peak of ripeness. More commonly, crops are strip picked, where all berries are harvested simultaneously regardless of ripeness by person or machine. After picking, green coffee is processed by one of two methods—the dry process method, simpler and less labour intensive as the berries can be strip picked, and the wet process method, which incorporates fermentation into the process and yields a mild coffee.
Cola Nut
Common Apple-berry
Conkerberry
Cornelian Cherry
Costa Rican Guava
Cranberry
Crowberry
Cupuaçu
Currant
Curry-leaf Tree
Custard Apple
Damson Plum Damson Plum The skin of the damson can have a very tart flavour, particularly when unripe. The fruit is therefore most often used for cooking, and is commercially grown for preparation in jam and other fruit preserves.

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Date
Date Plum
Davidson’s Plum
Dead Man’s Fingers
Desert Banana
Desert Fig
Desert Lime The desert lime fruit is a highly prized bushfood used in a range of products, including marmalades, beverages, and glaced fruit. It has a strong lime-like flavour. It is wild harvested from surviving bushland areas where it is relatively common. However, the desert lime has also been extensively cleared from some areas due to agricultural practices. Commercial cultivation is beginning to reduce the reliance on wild harvested product.
Dodder Laurel
Doubah
Double Coconut or Coco-de-mer
Dragonfruit Dragon fruit is a beautiful fruit grown in Southeast Asia, Mexico, Central and South America, and Israel. The plant is actually a type of cactus, and the fruit comes in 3 colours: 2 have pink skin, but with different coloured flesh (one white, the other red), while another type is yellow with white flesh. Dragon fruit is low in calories and offers numerous nutrients, including Vitamin C, phosphorus, calcium, plus fibre and antioxidants. Dragon fruit tastes wonderful! – sweet and crunchy, with a flavour that’s like a cross between kiwi and pear.
Duku
Durian
Eastern May Hawthorn
Elderberry
Elephant Apple
Emblica, see Indian gooseberry
Emu Apple
Emu Berry
Falberry
False-mastic
Feijoa
Fibrous Satinash
Fig
Finger Lime The finger lime has been recently popularised as a gourmet bushfood. The globular juice vesicles have been likened to a “lime caviar “, which can be used as a garnish or added to various recipes. The fresh vesicles have the effect of a burst of effervescent tangy flavour as they are chewed. The fruit juice is acidic and similar to that of a lime. Marmalade and pickles are also made from finger lime. The finger lime peel can be dried and used as a flavouring spice.
Florida Strangler Fig
Gac
Galia Melon
Gambooge
Genip
Giant Colombian Blackberry
Giant Granadilla
Gooseberry
Gooseberry, Ceylon
Gooseberry, Indian
Gooseberry, Otaheite
Gooseberry, Cape Physalis peruviana Refer to Cape Gooseberry

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Goumi
Governor’s Plum
Granadilla, Montessa
Granadilla, yellow
Grape
Grapefruit
Greengage
Ground Plum
Grumichama
Guanabana
Guarana
Guava
Guava, Cattley
Guava, Chilean
Guava, Costa Rican
Guava, pineapple
Guava, purple
Guava, strawberry
Guavaberry – Rumberry
Hackberry
Hairless Rambutan
Hardy Kiwi
Hawthorn
Hog Plum
Honeydew
Honeysuckle
Horned Melon
Huckleberry
Huito
Ice Cream Bean
Ilama
Illawarra Plum
Imbe
Imperial Mandarin Imperial Mandarins The most popular mandarin variety because they are the first to be harvested each season. They are a golden-orange mandarin, and one of a handful of popular citrus varieties that have originated in Australia.

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Indian Almond
Indian Fig
Indian Gooseberry
Indian Jujube
Indian Prune
Jabuticaba
Jackfruit Enormous and prickly on the outside, jackfruit looks somewhat like durian (though jackfruit is usually even larger). Once a jackfruit is cracked open, what you will find inside are pods or “bulbs”. Often referred to as the seeds, these bulbs are actually a kind of fleshy covering for the true seeds or pits, which are round and dark like chestnuts. The fleshy part (the “bulb”) can be eaten as is, or cut up and cooked. When unripe (green), it is remarkably similar in texture to chicken, making jackfruit an excellent vegetarian substitute for meat. In fact, canned jackfruit (in brine) is sometimes referred to as “vegetable meat”.
Jamaica Pepper Whole allspice berries Refer to Allspice.

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Jamaican Pimento Whole allspice berries Refer to Allspice.

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Jambul
Jatobá
Jelly Palm
Jocote
Jujube
Jujube, Chinese
Jujube, Indiana
Juniper Berry
Kabosu
Kaffir Lime Leaves Kaffir lime leaves come from the Kaffir lime tree, a lime tree native to Indonesia. The leaves are highly aromatic and suitable for various Asian cuisines, including Thai, Indonesian, Cambodian and Lao cuisines. They are easily recognisable by their emerald-green, doubled sections, which makes them appear as if two leaves are joined together.
Kahikatea
Kakadu Lime
Kakadu Plum
Kandis
Kapok
Karkalla
Karonda
Kei Apple
Kepel Fruit
Keule
Key Lime The Key lime is a citrus species with a globose fruit, 2.5–5 cm in diameter, that is yellow when ripe but usually picked green commercially. It is smaller and seedier, with a higher acidity, a stronger aroma, and a thinner rind, than that of the Persian lime. It is valued for its unique flavour compared to other limes, with the Key lime usually having a more tart and bitter flavour.
Kitembilla
Kiwano
Kiwifruit Kiwifruit may look unpalatable at first glance, but beneath that hairy brown exterior lies emerald green flesh with a flavour reminiscent of strawberries to some and pineapple to others. As tempting as it is in desserts, this sweet, yet slightly tart fruit also works well in savoury dishes. Most people prefer to either peel kiwi fruit or slice in half and scoop out the flesh with a spoon. However, there are some varieties that are scarcely hairy at all, and these may be eaten skin and all if you are feeling adventurous. An egg-slicer may be used to slice peeled kiwifruit into uniform slices for recipes or as a colourful garnish.
Korlan
Kumquat
Kumquat, meiwa
Kumquat, nagami
Kundong
Kutjera
Kwai Muk
Lady Apple
Lakoocha
Langsat Langsat Fruits look much like small potatoes and are borne in clusters similar to grapes. The larger fruits are on the variety known as duku. It is covered by thin, yellow hair giving a slightly fuzzy aspect.

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Lanzones
Lapsi
Lardizabala
Lemon The lemon is a small evergreen tree native to Asia, and the tree’s ellipsoidal yellow fruit. The fruit’s juice, pulp and peel, especially the zest, are used as foods. The juice of the lemon is about 5% to 6% citric acid, which gives lemons a sour taste. The distinctive sour taste of lemon juice makes it a key ingredient in drinks and foods such as lemonade.
Lemon Aspen
Leucaena
Lillypilly
Little Gooseberry Tree
Lime The Persian lime tree has no thorns and produces thicker-skinned fruit larger than the Key lime which keeps longer. These good traits make it a preferable commercial crop. The fruit is oval-shaped, about the same size as a lemon, with a vivid green peel which turns yellow when ripe.
Limeberry
Limequat
Lingonberry
Loganberry
Longan Longan The fruit is sweet, juicy and succulent in superior agricultural varieties, and apart from being eaten fresh, is also often used in East Asian soups, snacks, desserts, and sweet-and-sour foods, either fresh or dried, sometimes canned with syrup in supermarkets.

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Loquat
Louvi
Lúcuma Though this fruit is very popular and economically important in the areas of its nativity, it has not spread outside South America. It is actually not allowed to be exported as a whole fruit. Instead, the powder is being exported and used to create delicious recipes.
Lulo Naranjilla Refer to Naranjilla

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Lychee Lychees The Lychee has a delicate, whitish pulp with a floral smell and a fragrant, sweet flavour. Since this perfumey flavour is lost in canning, the fruit is usually eaten fresh.

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Ma-praang
Mabolo
Macadamia
Macadamia, rough shell
Madrono
Malabar Plum
Malay Apple
Mamey Sapote
Mammee Apple
Mamoncillo
Mandarin
Mangaba
Mango Mangoes The mango is generally sweet, although the taste and texture of the flesh varies across cultivars, some having a soft, pulpy texture similar to an overripe plum, while the flesh of others is firmer, like a rockmelon or avocado, or may have a fibrous texture.

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Mangosteen Mangosteen Mangosteen is native to South East Asia and is known as the Queen of Tropical Fruits. Its tree produces fruit of the most delectable flavours.

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Manila Tamarind
Manoao
Maqui
Marang
Marula
Matoke Matoke The medium-sized green fruits, which are of a specific group of banana, the East African Highland bananas.

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Mayan Breadnut
Mayapple
Mayhaw
Maypop
Medlar
Meiwa Kumquat
Melinjo
Melon Pear
Midyim
Miracle Fruit
Indian Strawberry
Mombin, purple
Mombin, red
Mombin, yellow
Monkey Jackfruit
Monkey Tamarind
Monstera
Montessa Granadilla
Mora Común
Mora de Castilla
Morinda
Morinda Citrifolia
Moringa
Mortiño
Mountain Pepper
Mountain Soursop
Mulberry
Munydjudj
Mundu
Muntries
Muscadine
Muskmelon
Myrtle Pepper Whole allspice berries Refer to Allspice.

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Naartjie
Nagami Kumquat
Nageia
Nance
Nannyberry
Naranjilla Naranjilla Naranjilla is native to the Andes mountains in Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. The fruit has a leather like orange skin covered with a hairy fuzz. The inside looks like green tomato.

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Native Currant
Native Gooseberry
Native Raspberry
Nectarine The nectarine is a stone fruit related to the plum, cherry, almond, apricot, and peach. Nectarine flesh tastes and feels somewhat like mango flesh, and almost identical to peach flesh. Freestone nectarines have flesh that separates easily from the pit. Cling nectarines have flesh that clings to the pit.
Neem
Newspice Whole allspice berries Refer to Allspice.

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Néré
Nonda Plum
Noni
Nungu
Nutmeg The tree that produces nutmeg also produces mace – both spices come from the tree’s fruit, which splits into a red outer membrane (mace) and an inner brown seed (nutmeg). Nutmeg is both more pungent and sweeter than its brother, mace.
Oil Palm
Olive A staple of Mediterranean cuisines, olives are most often eaten out of hand, though cooks also use them to flavour everything from pizzas to martinis. Raw olives must be cured before they can be eaten, and the curing medium — usually lye, brine, or salt — affects their flavour and texture. So too does the olive’s degree of ripeness when it’s picked. Green olives are picked while unripe, which makes them denser and more bitter than brown or black olives, which stay on the tree until fully ripened.
Orange Orange trees are widely cultivated in tropical and subtropical climates for the sweet fruit, which is peeled or cut (to avoid the bitter rind) and eaten whole, or processed to extract orange juice, and for the fragrant peel.
Oregon Grape
Oroblanco
Otaheite Gooseberry Various parts of the plant are used for food. In India and Indonesia, the cooked leaves are eaten. While the fruit is eaten fresh, and is sometimes used as flavouring for other dishes in Indonesia, it is generally regarded as too tart to eat by itself in its natural form and is processed further. It is candied in sugar or pickled in salt, used in chutney, relish or preserves. In the Philippines, it is used to make vinegar as well as eaten raw soaked in salt or vinegar-salt solution and sold along the roadside. They make these into a syrup in Malaysia. Liberally sugared, it is also used to make fruit juice. In Thailand it is used as an ingredient to make Som tam.
Palmyra Palm/Toddy Palm
Panama Orange Calamondin Refer to Calamondin

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Papaya Two kinds of papayas are commonly grown. One has sweet, red (or orangish) flesh, and the other has yellow flesh; in Australia these are called “red papaya” and “yellow papaw”, respectively. Either kind, picked green, is called a “green papaya.”
Passion Fruit
Pawpaw
Peach Autumn Red peaches The peach is a member of the rose family, cousin to apricots, cherries, plums, and almonds. Nectarines are actually a fuzz-less, smaller variety of peach. Nectarines and peaches can develop spontaneously from each other via seed or sport bud.

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Peach Palm
Peanut Peanuts have many uses. They can be eaten raw, used in recipes, made into solvents and oils, medicines, textile materials, and peanut butter, as well as many other uses. Popular confections made from peanuts include salted peanuts, peanut butter (sandwiches, peanut candy bars, peanut butter cookies, and cups), peanut brittle, and shelled nuts (plain/roasted). Salted peanuts are usually roasted in oil and packed in retail-size plastic bags or hermetically sealed cans.
Peanut Butter Fruit Peanut Butter Fruit A small red-orange fruit with a sticky, dense pulp and a flavour resembling that of dried figs or peanut butter, hence the name. Additionally, the scent is unmistakably of peanut butter. Mostly eaten fresh, also used for jellies, jams, or preserves.

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Pear, European and Asian species
Pecan Pecans have a smooth shell and the kernel makes up 40-60% of the in-shell. The principle producing countries are the U.S., Mexico, Australia and Israel. Pecans are marketed in in-shell or shelled form and can be eaten raw or roasted. They’re used in the bakery, confectionery and dairy industry, in chocolate and ice creams. Pecans are also added to cereals, breads, pastries and biscuits, and are great in salads, main dishes, as toppings on desserts and as a snack.
Pepino
Pequi
Persian Lime The Persian lime is the variety most commonly found in grocery stores. It is usually seedless, and has light-green to yellow pulp which is tender and acidic, yet lacking the distinctive bouquet of the Key lime. It can be used interchangeably for the same purposes as Key limes and lemons, and is often used as a substitute for vinegar.
Persimmon
Peumo
Phalsa
Philippine Lime Calamondin Refer to Calamondin

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Pigeon Pea
Pigeon Plum
Pigface
Pili Nut
Pindo Palm
Pineapple The pineapple is technically not a single fruit, but a sorosis. The fruits of a hundred or more separate flowers grow on the plant spike. As they grow, they swell with juice and pulp, expanding to become the “fruit.” Pineapples do not grow on trees, as many erroneously think. They are the fruit of a bromeliad, rising from the centre on a single spike surrounded by sword-like leaves. The pineapple plant is the only bromeliad to produce edible fruit.
Pineapple Guava
Pink-flowered Native Raspberry
Pistachio
Pitaya
Pitomba
Plum The plum is a stone fruit related to the peach, cherry, almond, apricot, and nectarine. Choose plums with a pleasant smell. It’s common for plums to develop a yeast growth on the surface, like grapes. Plums will soften if left around, but will not gain a nice ripe taste and smell, like other fruits. They benefit more than most fruits from being picked when absolutely ripe, but before the wasps get them, and plums sold in supermarkets tend to have been picked too early, which means they suffer less damage in transit, but never develop the full taste and fragrance.
Pois Doux
Pomegranate The entire seed is consumed raw, though the watery, tasty aril is the desired part. The taste differs depending on the subspecies of pomegranate and its ripeness. The pomegranate juice can be very sweet or sour, but most fruits are moderate in taste, with sour notes from the acidic tannins contained in the aril juice. Pomegranate juice has long been a popular drink in Persian and Indian cuisine, and is now widely distributed in Australia, the United States and Canada.
Pomelo About Pomelo The pomelo tastes like a sweet, mild grapefruit (which is itself a hybrid of the pomelo and the orange), though the typical pomelo is much larger in size than the grapefruit.

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Pommecythère
Pommerac
Pond-apple
Prickly Pear
Pulasan
Pummelo
Pumpkin Pumpkins are very versatile in their uses for cooking. Most parts of the pumpkin are edible, including the fleshy shell, the seeds, the leaves, and even the flowers. When ripe, the pumpkin can be boiled, baked, steamed, or roasted. In its native North America, it is a very important, traditional part of the autumn harvest, eaten mashed and making its way into soups and purees. Often, it is made into pie, various kinds of which are a traditional staple of the Canadian and American Thanksgiving holidays. In Canada, Mexico, the United States, Europe and China, the seeds are often roasted and eaten as a snack.
Pupunha
Purple Apple-berry
Purple Granadilla
Purple Guava
Purple Mombin
Quandong
Queensland Ebony
Quince Most varieties of quince are too hard, astringent and sour to eat raw unless ‘bletted’ (softened by frost and subsequent decay). High in pectin, they are used to make jam, jelly and quince pudding, or they may be peeled, then roasted, baked or stewed. The flesh of the fruit turns red after a long cooking time. The very strong perfume means they can be added in small quantities to apple pies and jam to enhance the flavour. Adding a diced quince to apple sauce will enhance the taste of the apple sauce with the chunks of relatively firm, tart quince. The term “marmalade”, originally meaning a quince jam, derives from “marmelo,” the Portuguese word for this fruit.
Raisin Tree
Rambutan Rambutans can be purchased at Asian markets and Asian/Chinese food stores – look for them in the produce section. When buying rambutans, look for bright red skin. A little orange or yellow on the skins in addition to red is okay, but green skins mean the rambutans are unripe. Don’t buy rambutans that have turned black or have a lot of black “hairs”, as this indicates they are over-ripe.
Raspberry
Red Granadilla
Red Mombin
Red Mulberry
Rhubarb Commonly, it is stewed with sugar or used in pies and desserts, but it can also be put into savoury dishes or pickled. Rhubarb can be dehydrated and infused with fruit juice. In most cases, it is infused with strawberry juice to mimic the popular strawberry rhubarb pie.
Riberry
Rimu
Rollinia
Rose Apple
Rose Hip
Rose-leaf Bramble
Rose Myrtle
Rough Shell Macadamia
Rowan
Safou
Sageretia
Saguaro
Salak
Salal
Salmonberry
Sandpaper Fig
Santol
Sapote
Sapodilla
Satinash, fibrous
Saskatoonberry Saskatoon Berries  With a sweet, nutty taste, the fruits have long been eaten by Canada’s aboriginal people, fresh or dried. They are well known as an ingredient in pemmican, a preparation of dried meat to which saskatoon berries are added as flavour and preservative.

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Saw Palmetto
Sea-buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides)
Sea Grape
Serviceberry
Shipova
Small-leaf Tamarind
Snow Berry
Soncoya
Service Tree
Soursop
Southern Crabapple
Spanish Lime
Spanish Tamarind
Spiny Monkey-orange
Star Apple
Starfruit see Carambola
Strawberry In addition to being consumed fresh, strawberries can be frozen, made into preserves, as well as dried and used in prepared foods, such as cereal bars. Strawberries are a popular addition to dairy products, as in strawberry-flavoured milk, ice cream, milkshakes, smoothies, and yoghurts.
Strawberry Guava
Strawberry Myrtle
Strawberry Pear
Sugar Apple
Surinam Cherry
Sweet Apple-berry
Sweet Granadilla
Sweet Lemon)
Sweet Orange
Sweet Pepper
Sweetsop
Sycamore Fig
Tahitian Apple
Tamarillo
Tamarind Tamarind is a kind of sweet and sour fruit that grows in a pod. While some cuisines use tamarind to make desserts and even confectionery, in Thai cooking it is used mostly in savoury dishes. While pods of tamarind are available in many Asian stores, it is more convenient to purchase tamarind puree (and it tastes just as good). In this form, it resembles molasses. Look for it in jars at your local Asian market.
Tamarind, Manila
Tamarind, monkey
Tamarind, velvet
Tangerine
Tanjong
Texas Persimmon
Thimbleberry
To-tara
Toyon
Tropical Almond
Ugni
Vanilla
Velvet Tamarind
Wampee
Water Apple
Watermelon The watermelon fruit, loosely considered a type of melon – although not in the genus Cucumis – has a smooth exterior rind (green, yellow and sometimes white) and a juicy, sweet interior flesh (usually deep red to pink, but sometimes orange, yellow and even green if not ripe).
Wax Gourd
Wax Jambu
West Indian Cherry
White Aspen
White Mulberry
White Sapote
Whortleberry
Wild Grape
Wild Orange
Wild Peach
Wild Plum
(Wild Mango)
Wild Plum
(Desert Quandong)
Wild Mangosteen
Wineberry
Wolfberry The wolfberry is another name for the Goji berry
Wongi
Wood Apple
Yangmei
Yantok
Yellow Granadilla
Yellow Mombin
Yellow Plum
Youngberry Youngberry
Zig Zag Vine
Ziziphus, see Jujube

 

 

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