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Tropical Fruits – List of

Below is a List of Tropical Fruits with pictures and descriptions. Tropical fruits grow on plants of all habitats. The only characteristic that they share is an intolerance of frost.

Name Image Description
Abiu Abiu (Pouteria caimito) The inside of the fruit is translucent and white. It has a creamy and jelly-like texture and its taste is similar to the sapodilla — a sweet caramel custard.

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Açaí Acai Berry In the general consumer market, açaí is sold as frozen pulp, juice, or an ingredient in various products from beverages, including grain alcohol, smoothies, foods, cosmetics and supplements.

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Acerola Acerola-Barbados-Cherries Acerola is native to South America, Southern Mexico and Central America, but is now also being grown as far north as Texas and in subtropical areas of Asia, like India.

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Ackee Ackee Fruit on tree The ackee, also known as achee, akee apple or akee (Blighia sapida) is a member of the Sapindaceae (soapberry family), native to tropical West Africa.

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African Cherry Orange West African cherry orange The African cherry orange, Citropsis articulata, also known as the West African cherry orange or Uganda cherry orange (locally as omuboro) is a small citrus fruit about the size of a tangerine.

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Allspice Whole allspice berries  Allspice is a spice that is the dried unripe fruit (“berries”) of Pimenta dioica, a mid-canopy tree native to the Greater Antilles, southern Mexico, and Central America, now cultivated in many warm parts of the world.

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Ambarella Unripe ambarella fruit Ambarella (Spondias dulcis) is an equatorial or tropical tree, with edible fruit containing a fibrous pit. The fruit may be eaten raw – the flesh is crunchy and a little sour.

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American Persimmon Diospyros virginiana is a persimmon species commonly called the American Persimmon, Eastern Persimmon, “‘Simmon”, “Possumwood”, or “Sugar-plum”. It ranges from southern Connecticut/Long Island to Florida, and west to Texas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Kansas. The tree grows wild but has been cultivated for its fruit and wood since prehistoric times by Native Americans. See also Oriental Persimmon for the common persimmon in Australia.
Araza The fruit is distinctive and very appealing, but also very acidic (pH 2.4, similar to lemons). It is usually used to make juice or for culinary purposes such as making jam. It is cultivated in California, but is not very commercially exploited due to the poor shipping ability of the fruits. Some are large (up to 750g).
Atemoya
Avocado Cut and Whole Avocado  It is used in both savoury and sweet dishes, though in many countries not for both. Very popular in vegetarian cuisine, as substitute for meats in sandwiches and salads because of its high fat content.

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Babaco
Bacupari A fruit native to Brazil. Bacupari are yellow fruit with edible arils that have a sweet, pleasantly acidic taste and are said to have good anti-cancer properties. It is well known in Brazil as “bacupari” or “mangostão-amarelo” and is a very adaptable plant that will grow in any tropical or warm temperate climate and even take an occasional light frost.
Bacuri
Bael
Banana Banana Recipes Bananas are believed to have originated up to 10,000 years ago and some scientists believe they may have been the world’s first fruit.

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Barbadine
Barbados Cherry Acerola-Barbados-Cherries Refer to Acerola.

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Betel Nut
Bignay
Bilimbi
Biribi
Black Mulberry
Bolivian Coconut
Bottle Gourd
Breadnut
Burmese Grape
Caimito
Calabash Tree
Calamansi Calamondin Refer to Calamondin

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CamuCamu
Canistel
Cape Gooseberry
Capulin Cherry
Carambola Carambola The fruit has distinctive ridges running down its sides (usually five, but can sometimes vary); in cross-section, it resembles a star, hence its name. The entire fruit is edible and is usually eaten out of hand.
Cassabanana Cassabanana Sweetly scented and resembles a yellow-orange, orange-red, or maroon-black cucumber. Smooth glossy skin surrounds yellow to orange pulp.

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Cattley Guava
Cawesh
Ceriman
Ceylon Gooseberry
Chayote Choko  Refer to Choko

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Chempedak
Chenet
Cherimoya The cherimoya looks like no other fruit, it’s a cross between being heart-shaped and round with rough-textured but thin skin which varies from a yellow-greenish tinge to dark green. The fruit or pulp is very creamy and juicy usually a creamy white colour with a few dark seeds found within it.
Chilean Guava
Chinese Jujube
Cherry of the Rio Grande
Chinese Olive
Chupa-Chupa
Coco Plum
Cocona
Double Coconut
Coconut The coconut palm, Cocos nucifera, is a member of the family Arecaceae (palm family). It is the only accepted species in the genus Cocos. The term coconut can refer to the entire coconut palm, the seed, or the fruit, which, botanically, is a drupe, not a nut. The spelling cocoanut is an archaic form of the word. The term is derived from 16th century Portuguese and Spanish cocos, meaning “grinning face”, from the three small holes on the coconut shell that resemble human facial features.
Cola Nut
Costa Rican Guava
Cupuaçu
Curry-leaf Tree
Cocoplum
Custard Apple
Damson Plum The skin of the damson can have a very tart flavour, particularly when unripe (the term “damson” is often used to describe red wines with rich yet acidic plummy flavours).

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Date Plum
Dead Man’s Fingers
Dragonfruit
Duku
Durian
Elephant Apple
Emblica
Gambooge
Genip
Giant Granadilla
Governor’s Plum
Grapefruit
Grumichama
Guanabana
Guarana
Guava
Guavaberry
Hairless Rambutan
Hog Plum
Horned Melon
Huito
Honeydew
Ice Cream Bean
Ilama
Imbe
Indian Almond
Indian Fig
Indian Gooseberry
Indian Jujube
Indian Prune
Jaboticaba
Jackfruit Enormous and prickly on the outside, jackfruit looks somewhat like durian (though jackfruit is usually even larger). Once a jackfruit is cracked open, what you will find inside are pods or “bulbs”. Often referred to as the seeds, these bulbs are actually a kind of fleshy covering for the true seeds or pits, which are round and dark like chestnuts. The fleshy part (the “bulb”) can be eaten as is, or cut up and cooked. When unripe (green), it is remarkably similar in texture to chicken, making jackfruit an excellent vegetarian substitute for meat. In fact, canned jackfruit (in brine) is sometimes referred to as “vegetable meat”.
Jamaica Pepper Whole allspice berries Refer to Allspice.

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Jamaican Pimento Whole allspice berries Refer to Allspice.

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Jambul
Jatobá
Jelly Plum
Jocote
Kandis
Kapok
Karonda
Kei Apple
Kepel Fruit
Key Lime
Kitembilla
Kiwano
Kiwifruit The kiwifruit, or often shortened to kiwi in many parts of the world, is the edible berry of a cultivar group of the woody vine Actinidia deliciosa and hybrids between this and other species in the genus Actinidia.
Kwai Muk
Korlan
Kundong
Lakoocha
Langsat Langsat is cultivated mainly for its fruit, which can be eaten raw. The fruit can also be bottled in syrup. The wood is hard, thick, heavy, and resilient, allowing it to be used in the construction of rural houses.
Lanzones
Lemon The lemon is a small evergreen tree native to Asia, and the tree’s ellipsoidal yellow fruit. The fruit’s juice, pulp and peel, especially the zest, are used as foods. The juice of the lemon is about 5% to 6% citric acid, which gives lemons a sour taste. The distinctive sour taste of lemon juice makes it a key ingredient in drinks and foods such as lemonade.
Leucaena
Limeberry
Limequat
Lime The Persian lime is the variety most commonly found in grocery stores. It is usually seedless, and has light-green to yellow pulp which is tender and acidic, yet lacking the distinctive bouquet of the Key lime. It can be used interchangeably for the same purposes as Key limes and lemons, and is often used as a substitute for vinegar.
Longan The seed is small, round and hard, and of an enamel-like, lacquered black. The fully ripened, freshly harvested shell is bark-like, thin, and firm, making the fruit easy to shell by squeezing the fruit out as if one is “cracking” a sunflower seed.
Loquat
Louvi
Lucuma
Lulo Naranjilla Refer to Naranjilla

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Lychee The Lychee has a delicate, whitish pulp with a floral smell and a fragrant, sweet flavour. Since this perfumey flavour is lost in canning, the fruit is usually eaten fresh.

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Mabolo
Macadamia
Madrono
Malabar Plum
Malay Apple
Mammee Apple
Mamey
Mamoncillo
Mangaba
Mango The mango is generally sweet, although the taste and texture of the flesh varies across cultivars, some having a soft, pulpy texture similar to an overripe plum, while the flesh of others is firmer, like a rockmelon or avocado, or may have a fibrous texture.
Mangosteen Mangosteen is native to South East Asia and is known as the Queen of Tropical Fruits. Its tree produces fruit of the most delectable flavours.

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Manila Tamarind
Ma-praang
Mayan Breadnut
Maypop
Medlar
Meiwa Kumquat
Melinjo
Melon Pear
Miracle Fruit
Monstera
Montessa Granadilla
Mountain Soursop
Monkey Jackfruit
Monkey Tamarind
Mundu
Muskmelon
Myrtle Pepper Whole allspice berries Refer to Allspice.

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Nagami Kumquat
Nance
Naranjilla Naranjilla Naranjilla is native to the Andes mountains in Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. The fruit has a leather like orange skin covered with a hairy fuzz. The inside looks like green tomato.

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Neem
Newspice Whole allspice berries Refer to Allspice.

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Noni
Nutmeg Nutmeg is a mystical spice with powers we both harness (gastronomically speaking) and must be wary of. For if you ingest too much of this magical seed, it might be the worst trip of your life, lasting days, with tons of unsavoury side effects. But just a dash here and a sprinkle there, and nutmeg adds a mildly sweet and bitter, not-to-be-missed dimension to all manner of dishes. The tree that produces nutmeg also produces mace – both spices come from the tree’s fruit, which splits into a red outer membrane (mace) and an inner brown seed (nutmeg). Nutmeg is both more pungent and sweeter than its brother, mace.
Oil Palm
Olive A staple of Mediterranean cuisines, olives are most often eaten out of hand, though cooks also use them to flavour everything from pizzas to martinis. Raw olives must be cured before they can be eaten, and the curing medium — usually lye, brine, or salt — affects their flavour and texture. So too does the olive’s degree of ripeness when it’s picked. Green olives are picked while unripe, which makes them denser and more bitter than brown or black olives, which stay on the tree until fully ripened. Olives become bitter if they’re cooked too long, so always add them to hot dishes at the last minute. Opened cans or jars of olives should be refrigerated, but some olives can be stored at room temperature if they’re submerged in brine or olive oil.
Otaheite Gooseberry Phyllanthus acidus, known as the Otaheite gooseberry, Malay gooseberry, Tahitian gooseberry, country gooseberry, star gooseberry, West India gooseberry, damsel, grosella (in Puerto Rico), karamay (in the Philippines), or simply gooseberry tree, is one of the trees with edible small yellow berries fruit in the Phyllanthaceae family. Despite its name, the plant does not resemble the gooseberry, except for the acidity of its fruits. It is mostly cultivated for ornamentation.
Orange
Oriental Persimmon Asian persimmon
Palmyra Palm
Papaya Two kinds of papayas are commonly grown. One has sweet, red (or orangish) flesh, and the other has yellow flesh; in Australia these are called “red papaya” and “yellow papaw”, respectively. Either kind, picked green, is called a “green papaya.”
Passionfruit
Pawpaw
Peach Palm
Peanut Butter Fruit It produces a small red-orange fruits with sticky, dense pulp and a flavour resembling that of dried figs or peanut butter, hence the name.
Pecan
Pepino
Pequi
Pewa
Phalsa
Pigeon Pea
Pili Nut
Pindo Palm
Pineapple The pineapple is technically not a single fruit, but a sorosis. The fruits of a hundred or more separate flowers grow on the plant spike. As they grow, they swell with juice and pulp, expanding to become the “fruit.” Pineapples do not grow on trees, as many erroneously think. They are the fruit of a bromeliad, rising from the centre on a single spike surrounded by sword-like leaves. The pineapple plant is the only bromeliad to produce edible fruit. Commercial pineapple plants are only harvested two to three years, because the fruit begins to get smaller with each year of plant life.
Pineapple Guava
Pistachio
Pitaya
Pitomba
Pois Doux
Pomegranate The entire seed is consumed raw, though the watery, tasty aril is the desired part. The taste differs depending on the subspecies of pomegranate and its ripeness. The pomegranate juice can be very sweet or sour, but most fruits are moderate in taste, with sour notes from the acidic tannins contained in the aril juice. Pomegranate juice has long been a popular drink in Persian and Indian cuisine, and is now widely distributed in Australia, the United States and Canada.
Pommecythère
Pommerac
Pulasan
Pummelo
Pupunha
Purple Guava
Purple Granadilla
Purple Mombin
Rambutan Rambutans are grown in Thailand as well as Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Australia. Most rambutans are red, but in Malaysia a smaller, yellow rambutan can also be found.
Red Granadilla
Red Mombin
Riberry
Ridged Gourd
Rollinia
Rose Apple
Rough Shell Macadamia
Safou
Salak
Santol
Sapodilla
Sea Grape
Soncoya
Soursop
Spanish lime
Star Apple
Strawberry Guava
Strawberry Pear
Sugar Apple
Summer Squash
Surinam Cherry
Sweet Granadilla
Sweet Orange
Sweet Pepper
Sweetsop
Tahitian Apple
Tangerine
Tamarind Tamarind is a kind of sweet and sour fruit that grows in a pod. While some cuisines use tamarind to make desserts and even confectionery, in Thai cooking it is used mostly in savoury dishes. While pods of tamarind are available in many Asian stores, it is more convenient to purchase tamarind puree (and it tastes just as good). In this form, it resembles molasses. Look for it in jars at your local Asian market.
Ugni
Vanilla
Velvet Tamarind
Voavanga
Wampee
Water Apple
Watermelon The watermelon fruit, loosely considered a type of melon – although not in the genus Cucumis – has a smooth exterior rind (green, yellow and sometimes white) and a juicy, sweet interior flesh (usually deep red to pink, but sometimes orange, yellow and even green if not ripe).
Wax Jambu
Wax Gourd
White Sapote
Winged Bean
Wood Apple
Xigua
Yantok
Yellow Granadilla
Yellow Mombin
Youngberry Youngberry  The sweet taste and lack of many seeds make the Youngberry perfect for fresh eating. Though best eaten fresh, Youngberries can also be frozen to be enjoyed at a later time.

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Ziziphus

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John Doe
Professor of Botanics
Born and raised in Dublin, Ireland, John is a superior specialist in growing palms and exotic plants.
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