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Classic Roast Beef Dinner

The Sunday roast is a main meal that is traditionally served on Sundays but can be eaten on any day of the week, consisting of roasted meat, roast potato or mashed potato, with accompaniments such as Yorkshire pudding, stuffing, vegetables and gravy. Other names for this meal are cooked dinner, Sunday dinner, Sunday lunch, Sunday tea, Roast dinner, and Sunday joint (joint referring specifically to the joint of meat). The meal is often comparable to a less grand version of a traditional Christmas dinner.

Classic Roast Beef Dinner
The Sunday roast is a main meal that is traditionally served on Sundays but can be eaten on any day of the week, consisting of roasted meat, roast potato or mashed potato, with accompaniments such as Yorkshire pudding, stuffing, vegetables and gravy. Other names for this meal are cooked dinner, Sunday dinner, Sunday lunch, Sunday tea, Roast dinner, and Sunday joint (joint referring specifically to the joint of meat). The meal is often comparable to a less grand version of a traditional Christmas dinner.
Ingredients
  • 2.25 kg large piece beef
  • 25 g beef dripping or 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2 tablespoons plain flour
  • gravy browning
For Yorkshire pudding
  • 150g plain flour
  • 2 large eggs
  • 300 ml milk
  • 3 tablespoons fat from the roast beef or use beef dripping or vegetable oil
For the roasted vegetables
  • 1.35kg medium potatoes, cut into even pieces
  • 4 carrots, quartered lengthways
  • 4 large parsnips, quartered lengthways
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C. Calculate the meat cooking time, allowing about 20-25 minutes per 450g plus 20-30 minutes extra depending on whether you like meat that's cooked pink, medium with a touch of pink in the middle, or well done throughout.
  2. Season the surface of the meat with salt and black pepper and place in a roasting tin. The size of the tin you choose really depends on whether you are going to cook the roast vegetables around the meat, or in a separate tin. Add the dripping or oil.
  3. Cook for the calculated time less 40 minutes, basting occasionally. If you think the outside of the meat is getting too brown, cover it lightly with kitchen foil.
  4. Meanwhile, make the Yorkshire pudding batter and prepare the vegetables. For the batter, put the flour and a pinch of salt in a bowl. Add the eggs and then the milk a little at a time, beating to give a thick, smooth batter. Stir in 150 ml cold water. Cover and leave to one side until required. Alternatively, you can whizz all of the ingredients together in a liquidiser goblet if you have one, but you have to remember to make the milk up to 450ml with cold water.
  5. Put the potatoes in a large saucepan and just cover with cold water. Bring to a fast, rolling boil then drain, reserving the water. Return them to the pan and shake vigorously to soften the edges and leave to one side.
  6. Place the carrots and parsnips in a large saucepan and cover with the reserved water (add more water if necessary) and bring just to the boil. Drain, reserving 170ml of the water for the gravy.
  7. Forty minutes before the end of the calculated cooking time, remove the meat from the oven and add all the vegetables to the roasting tin. Season generously and toss well. Return to the oven.
  8. Ten minutes before the end of the calculated cooking time, remove the meat from the oven and pour off the roasting fat (if available, otherwise use melted beef dripping or vegetable oil). Return the meat to the oven and pour 2 teaspoons fat into each of bun tins. Increase the oven temperature to 220°C and place the tins at the top of the oven for the fat to heat, it needs to be very hot before you add the batter
  9. Remove the meat from the oven but leave the vegetables to cook. Wrap the beef in kitchen foil and leave to rest.
  10. Stir the batter, then remove the tins from the oven and pour in the batter to fill each space and return to the oven. The puddings will take 20 to 30 minutes, to rise and crisp.
  11. After 25 minutes, check on the puddings and quickly remove the vegetables from the oven. Test them with a skewer to check they are tender and cooked right through, then transfer to a warmed serving plate or dish.
  12. Stir the flour into the meat juices in the roasting tin and cook over a gentle heat until absorbed and browned. Stir in the reserved vegetable water. Simmer until lightly thickened. Add gravy browning if you like your gravy to be dark in colour. Season the gravy, strain into a warmed jug and serve with the meat, veg and Yorkshire puddings.

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