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How to Make Egg Foo Yung


Egg foo young, (also spelled egg fooyung, egg foo yong, egg fu yung, or egg furong) is an omelette dish found in Chinese Indonesian, British and Chinese American cuisine. The name comes from the Cantonese language. Egg foo young is derived from Fu Yung Egg Slices, a mainland Chinese recipe from Shanghai.

Preparation of Egg Foo Yung

Literally ‘lotus egg’, this dish is prepared with beaten eggs and minced ham. It may be made with various vegetables such as bean sprouts, bamboo shoots, sliced cabbage, spring onions, mushrooms and water chestnuts. When meat is used as an ingredient, a choice of roast pork, shrimp, chicken, beef, or lobster may be offered.

In Chinese Indonesian cuisine, it is well known as Fu yung hai or sometimes spelled as Pu yung hai, the ingredients of the omelette usually made from the mixture of vegetables such as carrots, bean sprouts and cabbages, mixed with meats such as crab meat, shrimp or minced chicken. The dish is served in sweet and sour sauce with peas.

In Western countries, the dish usually appears as a well-folded omelette with the non-egg ingredients embedded in the egg mixture, covered in or served with sauce or gravy. Chinese chefs in the United States, at least as early as the 1930s, created a pancake filled with eggs, vegetables, and meat or seafood. In a US regional variation, many American-Chinese restaurants in St. Louis, Missouri serve what is called a St. Paul sandwich, which is an egg foo yung patty served with mayonnaise, dill pickle, and sometimes lettuce and tomato between two slices of white bread.

Egg Foo Yung
Serves 4
Literally 'lotus egg', this dish is prepared with beaten eggs and minced ham. It may be made with various vegetables such as bean sprouts, bamboo shoots, sliced cabbage, spring onions, mushrooms and water chestnuts. When meat is used as an ingredient, a choice of roast pork, shrimp, chicken, beef, or lobster may be offered.
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Ingredients
  1. 3 - 4 tablespoons peanut oil
  2. 2 spring onions, white and green parts, chopped
  3. ¾ cup chopped raw shrimp, rehydrated shiitake mushroom, char siu pork, or leftover roast chicken
  4. ¼ cup chopped water chestnuts
  5. ¼ cup finely chopped celery or bamboo shoots
  6. 2 cups bean sprouts
  7. 1½ tablespoons soy sauce, plus more for dipping
  8. 1 - 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour (use more for a firmer texture)
  9. ⅛ teaspoon ground black or white pepper
  10. 5 large eggs
  11. 1 - 2 thinly sliced Thai or Serrano chillies, Chilli Garlic Sauce, or Thai Sriracha Hot Chilli Sauce.
Instructions
  1. Heat 1 tablespoons of oil in a medium skillet. Add the spring onions and cook for about 15 seconds, or until aromatic. Add the shrimp, water chestnut, and celery. Cook for about 45 seconds, until aromatic.
  2. Add the bean sprouts and cook for about 2 minutes, until slightly softened. Add the soy sauce and cook for about 1 minute, until the bean sprouts have wilted. Sprinkle on the flour and stir to combine. Cook, stirring, for about 30 seconds, until the mixture coheres. Set aside to cool for about 5 minutes.
  3. In a bowl, beat the eggs. Add the cooked mixture and combine well.
  4. Pour enough oil to film the bottom of a medium or large skillet. Heat over medium-high heat. Ladle about ¼ cup of the egg mixture to form 10 cm wide omelettes. Gently fry for 1 to 2 minutes per side, until golden brown. Between batches, replenish the oil and adjust the heat to prevent burning. Serve hot or warm with condiments.
Egg Foo Yung Cooking Tips
  1. For extra flavour, prepare a sauce: Egg Foo Yung is one of the few Chinese dishes where a sauce is prepared separately and served over it. The brown sauce that frequently accompanies Beef with Broccoli works well with this dish.
  2. Use your imagination when choosing fillings. There are no hard and fast rules about what ingredients go into Egg Foo Yung: Chinese sausage, barbecued pork, shrimp, and even tofu are all popular. For vegetables, mushrooms, onion, and spring onion are frequently used. You might also like to try lots of crunchy mung bean sprouts!
  3. To coax more flavour out of the vegetables, blanch or stir-fry before adding to the egg mixture, even if the recipe doesn't call for it. Make sure blanched vegetables are well drained.
  4. Lightly beat the eggs, but not enough so that bubbles form.
  5. Thinly slice the meat and vegetables for more even cooking.
  6. Do not add the other ingredients to the egg in the pan. Instead, mix them together with the egg before cooking.
  7. Make sure the pan is hot enough so that the egg mixture cooks properly.
  8. If making a sauce, prepare it first and keep warm while cooking the Egg Foo Yung.
  9. Form the eggs into small pancakes or one large pancake.
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