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Spudnuts – Mashed Potato Doughnuts

The potato doughnut, sometimes called a Spudnut, is a doughnut, typically sweet, made with either mashed potatoes or potato starch instead of flour, the most common ingredient used for doughnut dough. Potato doughnuts were introduced in the mid-1900s, and a recipe was published in 1938. Potato doughnuts tend to be lighter than flour doughnuts, and are prepared in a similar method to other doughnuts. A chain of Spudnut Shops was established across the United States in the 1950s before declining to a few dozen more recently. Fried ube dough is also eaten in East Asia. Much like flour doughnuts, potato doughnuts are often accompanied with coffee.

Spudnuts - Mashed Potato Doughnuts recipe
The potato doughnut, sometimes called a Spudnut, is a doughnut, typically sweet, made with either mashed potatoes or potato starch instead of flour, the most common ingredient used for doughnut dough. Potato doughnuts were introduced in the mid-1900s, and a recipe was published in 1938. Potato doughnuts tend to be lighter than flour doughnuts, and are prepared in a similar method to other doughnuts. A chain of Spudnut Shops was established across the United States in the 1950s before declining to a few dozen more recently. Fried ube dough is also eaten in East Asia. Much like flour doughnuts, potato doughnuts are often accompanied with coffee.
Ingredients
For the doughnuts
  • 2 medium-size potatoes, peeled
  • 2½ - 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 large eggs
  • ¾ cup plus 1½ tablespoons potato cooking water (divided use)
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • 1½ tablespoons butter
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1¼ teaspoons active dry yeast
  • ½ teaspoon ground mace
  • ⅛ teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
  • oil for deep-frying
For the glaze
  • ¼ cup whole milk
  • 2 cups icing sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
Instructions
Procedure to make the doughnuts
  1. Boil the potatoes until fork tender. Set aside the cooking liquid. Push the potatoes through a food mill or mash by hand, leaving no lumps. Measure out ¾ cup of mashed potatoes.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer, combine the mashed potatoes with ½ cup of flour and the egg.
  3. In a small pot, heat the ¾ cup of potato water, sugar, butter, and salt over low heat until the butter has melted. Stir this mixture into the potato mixture and blend until smooth.
  4. Dissolve the yeast in the remaining 2 tablespoons of warm potato water. Add to the potato mixture. Mix in the mace and nutmeg and mix thoroughly.
  5. Add remaining flour a little at a time, with your mixer on low and fitted with the dough hook, until a stiff dough forms. Continue kneading until smooth and elastic.
  6. Remove dough to a greased bowl and place in a warm spot to rise until doubled in bulk, about one hour.
  7. Turn the dough onto a floured surface and roll to 1 cm thickness. Cut the dough with a floured biscuit or doughnut cutter. (You may find this dough to be pretty soft, so use a biscuit cutter since it's easier to move the full circle around than it is to move around the doughnut shape.)
  8. Cover and let rise until doubled in bulk, about 45 minutes.
  9. Heat a deep skillet or pot with 4 cm of oil to 190°C. Fry the doughnuts in batches (don't overcrowd the pan), flipping as needed until golden brown on both sides.
  10. Drain a paper towel lined plate.
Procedure to make the glaze
  1. Heat the milk in a small saucepan until warm. Remove from the heat and stir in the icing sugar and vanilla. Whisk together to form a glaze. Dunk the warm doughnuts in the glaze. Let sit for 5 minutes to set.
Nutrition Information
Calories: 4396 Fat: 47g Saturated fat: 16g Unsaturated fat: 25g Trans fat: 1g Carbohydrates: 899g Sugar: 294g Sodium: 1331mg Fiber: 26g Protein: 91g Cholesterol: 238mg
 
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