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Sayur Lodeh – Vegetable in Coconut Milk Soup

Sayur lodeh is a popular vegetable in coconut milk soup in Indonesian cuisine. Common ingredients are young jackfruit, eggplant, chayote, melinjo, long beans, tofu, tempeh all cooked in coconut milk soups and sometimes enriched with chicken or beef stock. Sometimes green stink bean is also mixed within sayur lodeh.

The origin of the dish can be traced to Javanese people of Java. It is well-known belongs within Javanese cuisine and has spread throughout Indonesia. The ingredients of Sayur Lodeh is similar to Sayur Asem, with the main difference in its soup, Sayur Lodeh is coconut milk-based while Sayur Asem is tamarind-based.

 

Sayur Lodeh - Vegetable in Coconut Milk Soup
Sayur lodeh is a popular vegetable in coconut milk soup in Indonesian cuisine. Common ingredients are young jackfruit, eggplant, chayote, melinjo, long beans, tofu, tempeh all cooked in coconut milk soups and sometimes enriched with chicken or beef stock.
Author:
Cuisine: Indonesian
Recipe type: Soup
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Ingredients
  • oil
  • ½ onion, finely sliced
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed
  • 3 cm ginger, grated
  • 1 teaspoon shrimp paste
  • 1 teaspoon chopped chilli
  • 1 cup prawns (optional)
  • salt, to taste
  • 4 cups mixed vegetables, chopped roughly (e.g. cabbage, broccoli, carrots, green beans, potatoes, celery)
  • ½ teaspoon galangal (optional)
  • 1½ cups vegetable stock
  • 1½ cups coconut milk
Instructions
  1. Fry onion with garlic in a little oil until they change colour. Add ginger, shrimp paste and chilli and cook for 2-3 minutes.
  2. Add salt, then the vegetables and prawns, if using; fry 2-3 minutes, then add stock and coconut milk. Stir until it comes to the boil, then boil fast for 2 minutes.
  3. Reduce heat and simmer until the vegetables have softened sufficiently to serve.
Notes
Sayur lodeh could be served with steamed rice (separated or mixed in one plate), or with sliced lontong rice cake. Although sayur lodeh basically is a vegetarian dish, it is popularly consumed with ikan asin (salted fish), opor ayam, empal gepuk or beef serundeng. Sambal terasi is usually served separately.

 

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