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Andouille

 



Andouille sausage is a classical Louisiana smoked sausage which is used in meals like gumbo or jambalaya. The regional cooking style known as Cajun employs many hot spices and vegetables and is famous for its original sausages: Andouille, Boudain, Chaurice (local version of Spanish chorizo) or Tasso (smoked butt). It was brought to Louisiana by the French immigrants and Acadian exiles that would merge to create much of Cajun Culture.

It is not easy to come up with a universal Andouille sausage recipe. Some recipes include dry red wine, others bay leaves, allspice, sage, paprika, crushed red peppers, sugar, onion powder, pequin pepper, mace, nutmeg, sage, ancho chilli, file powder etc… So which one is the real Andouille Sausage?

As nearly all recipes agree on the following ingredients: pork butt, salt, cracked pepper, garlic, thyme and cayenne pepper, we have kept it simple and included only those mentioned and nothing else. You can of course improvise and include any spices that you like.

Overview

Andouille in the US

In the US the sausage is most often associated with Louisiana Cajun cuisine, where it is a coarse-grained smoked sausage made using pork, garlic, pepper, onions, wine, and seasonings. The pork used is mostly from a smoked Boston shoulder roast. Once the casing is stuffed, the sausage is smoked again (double smoked). Nicknamed “The Andouille Capital of the World,” the town of LaPlace, Louisiana, on the Mississippi River, is especially noted for its Creole andouille. Though somewhat similar, andouille is not to be confused with “hot links” or similar finely ground, high-fat, heavily peppered sausages.

Andouille in France

In France, particularly Brittany, the traditional ingredients of andouille are primarily pig chitterlings, tripe, onions, wine, and seasoning. It is generally grey in colour and has a distinctive odour. Also, a similar sausage is available called andouillette, literally “little andouille.” Some varieties use the pig’s entire gastrointestinal system.

Andouille Sausage
Andouille sausage is a classical Louisiana smoked sausage which is used in meals like gumbo or jambalaya. The regional cooking style known as Cajun employs many hot spices and vegetables and is famous for its original sausages: Andouille, Boudain, Chaurice (local version of Spanish chorizo) or Tasso (smoked butt).
Author:
Cuisine: Cajun
Recipe type: Sausage Making
Ingredients
Meat
  • 1 kg pork butt
Ingredients per 1000g (1 kg) of meat
  • 2¾ teaspoons salt
  • ⅓ teaspoon Kwikurit
  • 3 teaspoons cracked black pepper
  • 3 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1½ teaspoons dried thyme
  • 2 teaspoons cayenne pepper
  • ⅜ cup cold water
Instructions
  1. Grind all meat with 5 - 6 mm plate.
  2. Mix meat with all ingredients, including water.
  3. Stuff into 38 - 40 mm hog casings. Leave as a rope or make 30 cm links.
  4. Dry for two hours at room temperature or preheat smoker to 54º C and hold without smoke for one hour.
  5. Apply hot smoke for 2 hours.
  6. Shower for 5 minutes with cold water.
  7. Store in refrigerator and cook before serving
Notes
To make a ready to eat sausage increase smoker temperature to 76ºC until internal temperature of 68ºC is obtained. You may poach it in water at 80º - 85ºC until internal temperature of 68ºC is obtained.

 

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