«

»

Profiterole




A profiterole, cream puff, or choux à la crème is a filled French choux pastry ball with a typically sweet and moist filling of whipped cream, custard, pastry cream, or ice cream. The puffs may be decorated or left plain or garnished with chocolate sauce, caramel, or a dusting of icing (powdered) sugar. Savoury profiterole are also made, filled with pureed meats, cheese, and so on. These were formerly common garnishes for soups.
Choux with chocolate ganache

Choux with chocolate ganache

Preparation

First, the chef must prepare choux pastry dough, a light pastry dough used to make profiteroles, croquembouches, éclairs, French crullers, beignets, St. Honoré cake, quenelles, Parisian gnocchi, dumplings, gougères, chouquettes and craquelins. It contains only butter, water, flour and eggs. Instead of a raising agent, it employs high moisture content to create steam during cooking to puff the pastry. The pastry is used in many European and European-derived cuisines.

The choux pastry paste is piped through a pastry bag or dropped with a pair of spoons into small balls and baked to form largely hollow puffs. After cooling, the baked profiteroles are injected with filling using a pastry bag and narrow piping tip, or by slicing off the top, filling them, and reassembling. For sweet profiteroles, additional glazes or decorations may then be added.

Presentation

The most common presentations are pastry cream, whipped cream, or ice cream filling, topped with powdered sugar or chocolate ganache and possibly more whipped cream. They are also served plain, with a crisp caramel glaze, iced, or with fruit.

Filled and glazed with caramel, they are assembled into a type of pièce montée called croquembouches, often served at weddings in France and Italy, during the Christmas holiday in France, and are served during important celebrations in Gibraltar. Profiteroles are also used as the outer wall of St. Honoré Cake.

History

The word profiterole (also spelled prophitrole, profitrolle, profiterolle) has existed in English since 1604, borrowed from French. The original meaning in both English and French is unclear, but later it came to mean a kind of roll “baked under the ashes”. A 17th-century French recipe for a Potage de profiteolles or profiterolles describes a soup of dried small breads (presumably the profiteroles) simmered in almond broth and garnished with coxscombs, truffles, and so on. The current meaning is only clearly attested in the 19th century. Although both the pastry and the name profiterole initially came from France, profiteroles are one of the main national dishes in Gibraltar.

 

Comments and Feedback

Be the First to Comment!

avatar
 
smilegrinwinkmrgreenneutraltwistedarrowshockunamusedcooleviloopsrazzrollcryeeklolmadsadexclamationquestionideahmmbegwhewchucklesillyenvyshutmouthapplausewhat-is-thatwell-donewant-a-tasteparty-animal
  Subscribe  
Notify of
Latest posts
 
Shchi - Traditional Russian Cabbage Soup Cream of Crab Soup Russian Rassolnik Cawl Cennin - Welsh Leek Soup Vichyssoise Soup Joumou Caldillo de Perro - Fish Soup with Bitter Orange Binignit Sopa de Lima Mexican Seven Seas Soup
 
Top 10 Recipes
 
Chicken Parmigiana KFC Pepper Mayo Clamato Juice Outback Steakhouses Steak Seasoning How to Make Basic Fritter Batter The-Aussie-Egg-And-Bacon-Pizza
 
Food & Health
 
Green Is The New Black superfood Fish and Shellfish Poisoning Fish and Shellfish Poisoning Rockmelon Ripe Tomatoes